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  Hardware  |   Software  |   Performance  |   Compatibility  

PS/2 FAQ Version 5.5 from Christopher Feeny

Just the FAQ, Please!


Archive-name: PS2-FAQ
Previously-modified: 12/15/1998
Last-modified: 01/07/1999
Version: 5.5
Author: Christopher Feeny
Email: alkemyst@shadow.net

Table of Contents:

S) 1.0 Introduction
Q) Foreword
Q) 1.1 What does this FAQ cover and how do I use this FAQ?
Q) 1.2 What are the different PS/2s and their features?
Q) 1.3 What are the IBM brand MCA cards?
Q) 1.4 Where do I get a Reference Disk for my PS/2?
Q) 1.5 Which file is my Reference Disk? They are all cryptically
written.
Q) 1.6 What does the Reference Disk do?
Q) 1.7 I hear there is more diagnostics hidden on the Reference Disk,
where are they?
Q) 1.8 Why can't I copy my Reference Disk, I want to make a backup?
Q) 1.9 I got the Reference Disk, but now it is saying I need an Option
Diskette/or giving me a 165 error at POST...What are Option
Diskettes and Where do I get them?
Q) 1.10 I got the Option Diskette, but the Reference Diskette is telling me
no option files can be found, What am I doing wrong?
Q) 1.11 I bought my PS/2 second hand who can I get technical support from?
Q) 1.12 IBM tech. support says they do not know my answer now what?
Q) 1.13 Where can I find support on the internet?
Q) 1.14 I got an IBM MCA card with no labeling, How do I tell what it is?


S) 2.0 Motherboards
Q) 2.1 Where can I find a PS/2 motherboard?
Q) 2.2 Instead of a 'stock' motherboard can I get a more advanced board?
Q) 2.3 Will a standard motherboard work in a PS/2?
Q) 2.4 What motherboards come with a cache and are more up-to-date with
today's standards?
Q) 2.5 Which motherboards allow/prohibit additional on-board memory?
Q) 2.6 Can I use normal 72-pin SIMMs? 30-pin SIMMs?
Q) 2.7 How do I tell the speed of the PS/2 SIMMs I have now on my
motherboard?
Q) 2.8 What speed SIMMs do I need?
Q) 2.9 How good is MCA and what does it offer?
Q) 2.10 Which is better, ISA/EISA/VLB/PCI/etc?
Q) 2.11 Will an ISA card work in an MCA (PS/2) machine?
Q) 2.12 How do I enter the CMOS configuration menu?
Q) 2.13 What is bus mastering anyway?

S) 3.0 IO controllers/interfaces
Q) 3.1 How do IDE/MFM/RLL/ESDI/SCSI interfaces work?
Q) 3.2 How can I tell if I have MFM/RLL/ESDI/IDE/SCSI?
Q) 3.3 Why won't my two hard drives work together?
Q) 3.4 How do I install a second controller?
Q) 3.5 Which is better, SCSI or IDE or ESDI?
Q) 3.6 Can MFM/RLL/ESDI/IDE and SCSI coexist?
Q) 3.7 What's the difference between SCSI and SCSI-2? Are they
compatible?
Q) 3.8 Can I use a non-IBM ESDI in a PS/2?
Q) 3.9 Do I need a reference disk for my SCSI drive?
Q) 3.10 What is a 16550UART and do I need one? Does my PS/2 have it?
Q) 3.11 Should I buy an internal or external modem?
Q) 3.12 What kinds of sound cards are available?
Q) 3.13 Can I run both a SoundBlaster and the Audiovation/A?
Q) 3.14 Can I fake a keyboard so my computer will boot without it?

S) 4.0 Upgrading Processor/Coprocessor/Disks/Video/CDROM
Q) 4.1 I don't have the money for a new computer or motherboard, what can
I do?
Q) 4.2 What are the Benchmarks for the Processor Upgrades?
Q) 4.3 Which Math Co-Processor do I use?
Q) 4.4 How can get rid of my slow stock Hard Drive and get a faster and
larger capacity version?
Q) 4.5 How can I add a second floppy drive and what type will work with
my PS/2?
Q) 4.6 Is there an SVGA option for PS/2s?
Q) 4.7 How can I add a CD-ROM to my PS/2?
Q) 4.8 How can I build a Multimedia PS/2?
Q) 4.9 How can I get sound effects in DOOM?
Q) 4.10 How can I make my PS/2 Model 90/95 a Pentium 180/200MMX machine?

S) 5.0 Adding System and Cache memory
Q) 5.1 How do I add memory to my PS/2 off the motherboard?
Q) 5.2 How do I add cache memory to my PS/2?
Q) 5.3 Can I use the 4MB Modules in a machine that only calls for 1 or
2MB modules?
Q) 5.4 Who has memory the cheapest?
Q) 5.5 Is there a way to identify a PS/2 RAM card or SIMM?
Q) 5.6 What is the ECC memory options on some of the newer PS/2s?
Q) 5.7 What cache size do I have/can upgrade to?

S) 6.0 Diagnostics
Q) 6.1 What do the POST beeps mean?
Q) 6.2 What do the POST codes mean?
Q) 6.3 Why when my system boots fine sometimes the reference disk reports
errors?
Q) 6.4 How can I *REALLY* find out if these errors are just bogus?
Q) 6.5 OK I got a problem, who can I get to fix it?
Q) 6.6 What are the wrap plugs the reference disk sometimes refers too?

S) 7.0 Misc
Q) 7.1 What is the pin out for ...?
Q) 7.2 What is the special SCSI connector by IBM?
Q) 7.3 Where are benchmark programs located. What do they mean?

S) 8.0 Operating Systems (OS)
Q) 8.1 Can I run UNIX on my PS/2? Which UNIX variety works?
Q) 8.2 Why won't certain UNIXs run on my PS/2?
Q) 8.3 What is better for the PS/2, MSDOS or PCDOS?
Q) 8.4 Can I run Windows? What would I need?
Q) 8.5 Can I run Win95/98? What would I need?
Q) 8.6 Can I run Linux now?

S) 9.0 References
Q) 9.1 Who makes upgrades for a PS/2 computer (company phone #'s)
Q) 9.2 Is there automated FAX help available?

Appendix A MCA Brand Card and Part Listing
Appendix B IBM Reference Diskette Listing
Appendix C .ADF Modification for dual SB and Audiovation/A use
Appendix D POST Code Listing
Appendix E Pinouts
Appendix F PS/2 Sound Cards


S) 1.0 Introduction

Foreword

Thanks to:

Louis Ohland for all the parts he sent me and the FAQ
submissions he still does.

Charles Lasitter , President of NC Direct Marketing,
919-286-0100. He sent me a working PS/2 95 with monitor. The merchandise was
extremely clean and in great condition, keep in mind this was a donation...I
am sure paying customers will receive better equipment still (if that is
possible). He truly was very generous and is knowledgible in PS/2's. If
anyone needs anything I would contact him first.

Happy New Year. Welcome to the PS/2 FAQ. There is no cost for this document.
Also anyone is free to reprint and reformat it, including the conversion to
HTML, as long as the content does not change. I only ask that those who can
send me something...sort of like shareware. I am now a Computer Science
degree-seeing college student and to maintain this document and answer the
emails I recieve daily is a sacrifice. I try to get in a two hour workout
every other day and run 5 miles every other day, as well as try to keep
girlfriends happy, to work, attend class and study somewhere in there also, oh
and eat and sleep.

Things I need right now are:
o An AMD 5x86/133 chip and a Type 3 processor card (486/50) FRU #57F1579. I
had originally
considered a Pentium, but with LINUX there are problems with the HLT
sequence with Pentiums.

o Drive rails for the PS/2 95. I need 3 sets.

o SCSI CD-ROM Drive, any speed. (Can't be a Toshiba due to LINUX conflicts)

o 256k Cache module for the Model 95 for my Type 1 processor card. FRU
64F0199.

o Larger than 4MB SIMMS for my Model 95. I currently have 4MBx8 for 32MB
total, I would like
8MBx8 for 64MB. This will be a LINUX setup for my education.

o Of course cash donations are always accepted.

My address will be 3702 Old Lighthouse Circle, Wellington, Florida 33414.


Q) 1.1 What does this FAQ cover and how do I use this FAQ?

This FAQ is for the PS/2's and most other MCA machines. There may be some
information that is inaccurate for non-IBM machines and this information
should be gathered from the appropriate manufacturer. Also this is meant as a
supplement to the comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware FAQ, although one could possibly
use only this document for probably 90%+ of PS/2 issues. The c.s.i.p.h FAQ is
full of information (over 300k I believe) that any PC-compatible owner can use
almost everyday. The PS2 FAQ (almost 300k by itself), therefore, tries to
avoid repeating what can be obtained via this FAQ or other FAQ documents which
are easily available.

To use this FAQ easily, import it into any standard word processor and use a
global text search to find what you want. For instance, on WordPerfect hit F2
and enter the text you want to find and hit enter. The section numbers from
the table of contents make good search headings. There are web-based versions
(www.computercraft.com) of this document and although nicer for most, the idea
behind this FAQ is to give those with minimum ability access to the file.

If there are deficiencies, errors, and/or missing information you would like
to see email me at: alkemyst@shadow.net


Q) 1.2 What are the different PS/2s and their features?
Note: a very good reference can be found at ftp://ftp.simtel.com,
in /.3/simtelnet/msdos/info/ps2-ref.zip (#25,30,50,55,60,70,73,80).
(Thanks: dharding@saucer.cc.umr.edu)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------
| ####-xxx | | Factory |KB L2 | Bus | # of | Drive |Intro| Min.
Model | Model | Processor | set MHz |Cache | Type | Slots | Bays |Date | Price
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------
Model 25 |8525-001/G01/+ | 8086 | 8 0W | 0 | ISA8 | 2 | 2 |08/87|$ 2095
Model 25-286 |8525-G06/H06 | 80286 | 10 1W | 0 | ISA16| 2 | 2 |10/90|$ 2215
Model 25LS |8525 | 80286 | 10 | 0 | ISA | | | |
Model 30 |8530-001/2/21 | 8086 | 8 0W | 0 | ISA8 | 3 | 2 |04/87|$ 2595
Model 30-286 |8530-E01/E21 | 80286 | 10 1W | 0 | ISA16| 3 | 2 |09/88|$ 2965
Model 35SX |8535-040/43/24X| 80386SX | 20 0-2W| 0 | ISA16| 3 | 2 |06/91|
Model 35SLC |8535-050/55 | 80386SLC | 20 0W | 0 | ISA16| 3 | 2 |04/92|
Model 35LS |8535-14X/24X | 386SX | 20 | 0 | ISA | | |01/91|
Model 40SX |8540-040/43/45 | 80386SX | 20 0-2W| 0 | ISA16| 5 | 4 |06/91|
Model 40SLC |8540-050/55 | 386SLC | 20 0W | 0 | ISA16| 5 | 4 |04/92|
Model 50 |8550-021 | 80286 | 10 1W | 0 | MCA16| 4 | 3 |04/87|
Model 50Z |8550-031/61 | 80286 | 10 0W | 0 | MCA16| 4 | 3 |08/88|
Model 53SLC2 |9553-0BB | 80486SLC2 | 25/50 | | MCA | | | |
Model 53LS |9553-1BX/2BX | 80486SLC2 | 25/50 | | MCA | | | |
Model 55SX |8555-031/61/L?#| 80386SX | 16 0-2W| 0 | MCA16| 3 | 2 |05/89|$ 5545
Model 55LS |8555 | 80386SX | 16 0-2W| 0 | MCA16| 3 | 2 |10/90|
Model 56SX/LS |8556-043/5/9/+ | 80386SX | 20 | 0 | MCA16| 3 | 2 |10/91|$ 3560
Model 56SLC |8556-055/9/+ | 80386SLC | 20 | 0 | MCA16| 3 | 2 |02/92|$ 3615
Model 56SLC2 |9556-DB6/A | 80486SLC2 | 25/50 | 0 | MCA16| 3 | 2 |10/92|$ 2727
Model 57SX |8557-045/9 | 80386SX | 20 | 0 | MCA16| 5 | 4 |06/91|$ 4165
Model 57SLC |8557-055/9/05F | 80386SLC | 20 | 0 | MCA16| 5 | 4 |02/92|$ 4850
Model 57SLC2 |9557-DB6/A | 80486SLC2 | 25/50 | | MCA16| 5 | 4 | |
Model 57SLC3 |9557- | 80486SLC3 | | | MCA16| 5 | 4 | |
Model 57 Ult. |9557-1BA/2BA | 80486SLC2 | 25/50 | | MCA | | | |
Model 60 |8560-041/71 | 80286 | 10 1W | 0 | MCA16| 8 | 4 |04/87|$ 8245
Model 65SX |8565-061/121 | 80386SX | 16 | 0 | MCA16| 8 | 4 |06/90|$ 7495
Model 70-Exx |8570-E61 | 80386DX | 16 | 0 | MCA32| 3 | 3 |06/88|$ 8845
Model 70-xxx |8570-061/121 | 80386DX | 20 | 0 | MCA32| 3 | 3 |06/88|$11795
Model 70-Axx |8570-A21/61 | 80386DX | 25 | 64 | MCA32| 3 | 3 | |$
Model 70-Bxx |8570-B21/61 | 80486DX | 25 | 0 | MCA32| 3 | 3 |01/90|$17520
Model 70 |modification | 80486DX2 | 16|20/33| 0 | MCA32| 3 | 3 |10/93|
Model P70-386 |8570 | 80386DX | 20 | | MCA | | | |
Model P75-486 |8570 | 80486DX | 33 | | MCA | | | |
Model 76 |9576-DU6/DUA | 80486SX | 33 | 0 | MCA32| 3 | 3 |10/92|$ 3434
Model 76 |9576-OPTION | 80486DX2 | 33/66 | 0 | MCA32| 3 | 3 |10/92|
Model 77 0Ux |9577-0UF/UA | 80486SX | 33 | 0 | MCA32| 5 | 4 |10/92|$ 4153
Model 77 0Nx |9577-0NA/0NF | 80486DX2 | 33/66 | 0 | MCA32| 5 | 4 |10/92|$ 4920
Model 77 Ult. |9577-1UA/1NA | 80486DX2 | 33/66 | 0 | MCA32| 5 | 4 |10/92|$
Model 80-0xx |8580-041/071 | 80386DX | 16 | 0 | MCA32| 8 | 5/6 |04/87|$10895
Model 80-xxx |8580-111/21/321| 80386DX | 20 | 0 | MCA32| 8 | 5/6 |04/87|
Model 80-Axx |8580-A16/21/31 | 80386DX | 25 | 64 | MCA32| 8 | 5/6 |06/90|
Model 80 |modification | 80486DX | 25 | | MCA32| 8 | 5/6 | |
Model 80 |modification | 80486DX2 | 16|20/33| | MCA32| 8 | 5/6 |10/93|
Model 85-0Xx |9585-0X6/A/G/T | 80486SX | 33 | 0 | MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/92|$ 5415
Model 85-0Kx |9585-0KG/T | 80486DX | 33 | 128 | MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/92|
Model 85-xNx |9585-0NT/G/NNT | 80486DX2 | 33/66 | 256 | MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/92|
Model 90 XP 486|8590-0G5/H5/+ | 80486SX | 20/25 | 0 | MCA32| 4 | 4 |10/90|$10555
Model 90 XP 486|8590-OPTION | 80486DX | 33 | 0 | MCA32| 4 | 4 |10/90|
Model 90 XP 486|9590-DLA/LG/+ | 80486DX2 | 25/50 | 0 | MCA32| 4 | 4 |03/93|$ 5300
Model 95 XP 486|8595-0G9/F | 80486SX | 20 |256opt| MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/90|$12640
Model 95 XP 486|8595-0H9/F | 80486SX | 25 |256opt| MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/90|
Model 95 XP 486|8595-0J9/D/F | 80486DX | 20 |256opt| MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/90|
Model 95 XP 486|8595-0KD/F | 80486DX | 33 |256opt| MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/90|
Model 95 XP 486|8595-0LF | 80486DX | 50 |256opt| MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/90|
Model 95 XP 486|8595-0MG/T | 80486DX | 50 | 256 | MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/90|
Model 95 XP 486|9595-0LF/G | 80486DX2 | 25/50 | 0 | MCA32| 8 | 7 |10/92|$ 8865
Model 95 XP 486|9595-0MF/G/T | 80486DX | 50 | 256 | MCA32| 8 | 7 |06/91|
Model 95 Server|9595-1NG/T/V | 80486DX2 | 33/66 |256opt| MCA32| 8 | 7 |08/92|
Model 95 Server|9595-0PT/V/0PTF| Pentium | 60 | 256 | MCA32| 8 | 7 |08/93|
Model 95 Server|9595-0QG/V/+ | Pentium | 66 | 256 | MCA32| 8 | 7 |09/93|
Model 95 Array |9595-3NG/T | 80486DX2 | 33/66 |256opt| MCA32| 8 | 9 |08/92|
Model 95 Array |9595-3PG/T | Pentium | 60 | 256 | MCA32| 8 | 9 |08/93|
Model 95 Array |9595-3QG/T | Pentium | 66 | 256 | MCA32| 8 | 9 |09/93|

The -xxx suffix can usually be broken down to -ABC where,

A=number of hard drives usually, if A, B, or E rules below don't apply
B=processor: A=386DX25 B=486SLC2/50 G=486SX20 H=486SX25 J=486DX25
K=486DX33 L=486DX2/50 M=486DX50 N=486DX2/66 P=586/60
Q=586/66 U/X=486SX/33 Y=586/90 0=<286-10 2=286-10
4=386DX20 5=386SLC20
C=hard drive type: 6=104 A=208/212 B=250 F=400 G=540 T=1GB V=2GB X=none

Fourth letter is county/language identifier, F=Canadian French

All 85xx models are XGA or VGA, 95xx models are XGA-2 or SVGA.

LS models are usually identical to the SX counterparts but are diskless.

Model 90/95 special info follows below:
(Thanks Louis Ohland )

Stumbled across a reference document with a good overall description of the
four different complex types and their capabilities. I will get the link so
people can find the *.pdf also..

Some errata seemed to have snuck in- the DMA speed goes from 20 to 25MHz then
back again to 20MHz..

Original compiled by Roger Dodson, IBM. May 1996

The IBM Model 90, and Model 95, and PC Server 500 are unique in providing a
Processor Complex (adapter) that integrates the (1) processor, (2) memory
cache controller and L2 cache, (3) memory controller, (4) DMA controller, and
(5) I/O bus controller. This provides the capability to upgrade to new
technology by only replacing the Processor Complex.
Upgrading a processor along with the memory and I/O controller have a
significant effect on performance via a balanced, tuned system. Vendors that
do NOT change memory and I/O controllers run the risk of having an unbalanced
system that is not as efficient. There are four types of Processor Complexes
for these systems: Base or Type 1, 2, 3, and 4.

o Processor Complexes are interchangeable among Model 90's, Model 95's, and
the PC Server 500.

* Any existing Model 90, Model 95, or PC Server 500 can be upgraded to a new
Processor Complex. For example, Base 1 to Base 2 or Base 3 or Base 4; Base 2
to Base 4, etc. If "Upgrade" is listed above, then an upgrade option is
available.
All Processor Complexes withdrawn as of June 1996


Base 1 "G" 486SX 20 MHz (announced Oct 1990) 92F0049
Type 1 "J" 486DX 25 MHz (announced Oct 1990) 64F0201
"K" 486DX 33 MHz (announced Oct 1990) 64F0198

Upgrade 486DX 50 MHz (announced June 1991) 92F0048
Upgrade 486DX2 66/33 (announced Aug 1992) 64F0198
Cache Option All Base/Type 1
64F0199
* Level 2 memory cache socket for optional 256K write-through memory cache
(256 KB write-thru standard with 486DX 50 MHz).
* No math coprocessor socket ("J", "K", and "Upgrade" models already have a
math coprocessor as part of 486DX).
* 24 bit DMA; 10-12 MHz.
* Dual path memory design (Dual Bus Interleave). Allows both the processor
and busmasters to access memory concurrently though two paths.
* 20 MB per second data transfer support (for MCA bus).

Base 2 "H" / Upgrade 486SX 25 MHz (announced Oct 1991) 92F0079
Type 2 "L" / Upgrade 486DX2 50/25 (announced April 1992)92F0161
* No Level 2 cache socket on complex.
* Math coprocessor socket on "H" model only to add 80487 math coprocessor
or to add a 486DX2 50/25 MHz upgrade chip which has an integrated math
coprocessor.
* High speed 25 MHz DMA so that it is now synchronous with the 486; 24 bit

DMA.
* Faster bus arbitration (than Base 1) for busmasters to increase
performance.
* Memory controller to support both interleaved (higher performance -pairs
of SIMMs) and non-interleaved memory (allows single SIMMs).
* 20 MB per second data transfer support (for MCA bus).

Base 3 "M"/ Upgrade 486DX 50 MHz (announced April 1992)
57F1579
Type 3
* 40 MB per second streaming data transfer support. This is an advanced
Micro Channel I/O controller that provides faster data transfer rates to
increase performance.
* Error Checking and Correcting (ECC) memory controller which will
automatically correct any single bit errors on the fly (98% of memory
errors are single bit); all 2 bit errors are found which halt system;
some 3 and 4 bit errors are found which halt system; single bit errors
are logged with optional software (NetFinity?) and multiple bit errors
are logged in NVRAM.
* 256KB Level 2 memory cache (write-through) is standard.
* High speed 20 MHz DMA; 32 bit DMA so it can use DMA to directly address
all memory; DMA supports Subsystem Control Block.
* Faster bus arbitration (than Base 1) for busmaster performance.
* Enhanced dual path memory design (Dual Bus Interleave).
Although Base 1 allows both the processor and busmasters to access memory
concurrently through two paths, the Base 3 and 4 has buffers at both
paths to provide better performance. Also the buffer on the adapter side
(I/O buffer) uses packet data transfers for writes. This means 16 bytes
are collected and this packet is written in one cycle to memory as
opposed to writing for every 4 bytes received (as with unbuffered
systems).
* Subsystem Control Block enabled (see definition).
* Vital Product Data support. Allows software (LAN Network Manager, LAN
Mgmt Utilities/2) to obtain a unique serial number (identifier) on the
processor complex which is in ROM.
* Synchronous Channel Check support (see definition).
* Data bus parity support (see definition).
* A logging facility is provided (for ECC or system errors).

All trademarks are the property of their respective owners (listed on
Trademark sheet) No warranties are expressed or implied in this summary

Base 4 "N" / Upgrade 486DX2 66/33 MHz (announced Sept 1993)
61G2343 $772.00!
Type 4 "P" / Upgrade Pentium 60 MHz (announced Aug 1993)
52G9362
"Q" / Upgrade Pentium 66 MHz (announced Sept 1993)
92F0120
"Y" / Upgrade Pentium 90/60 MHz (announced Oct 1994)
06H3739 / 19H1027
* SynchroStream(TM)controller which uses IBM's most advanced technology
packaging to integrate 5 major chips (memory, I/O, DMA controllers, FIFO
buffers, ECC logic) into one chip. This technology allows the high-speed
interconnects and large streaming pipes that form the SynchroStream
engine to provide state-of-the-art performance. The SynchroSteam
controller synchronizes data traveling between major subsystems and
allows it to stream in parallel, at full bandwidth, to each subsystem
concurrently.
* 40 MB per second streaming data transfer support.
* Error Checking and Correcting (ECC) memory controller which will
automatically correct any single bit errors on the fly (98% of memory
errors are single bit); all 2 bit errors are found which halt system;
some 3 and 4 bit errors are found which halt system; single bit errors
are logged with optional software (NetFinity?) and multiple bit errors
are logged in NVRAM.
* 256 MB memory addressability (Base 1, 2, and 3 is 64 MB memory
addressability).
* 256 KB Level 2 memory cache (write-back) is standard on Pentium models.
256 KB Level 2 memory cache (write-back) is standard on 486DX2 models.
* High speed 20 MHz DMA; 32 bit DMA so it can use DMA to directly address
all memory; DMA supports Subsystem Control Block.
* Faster bus arbitration (than Base 1) for busmaster performance.
Enhanced dual path memory design (Dual Bus Interleave).
* Although Base 1 allows both the processor and busmasters to access memory
concurrently through two paths, the Base 3 and 4 has buffers at both
paths to provide better performance. Also the buffer on the adapter side
(I/O buffer) uses packet data transfers for writes. This means 16 Bytes
are collected and this packet is written in one cycle to memory as
opposed to writing for every 4 bytes received (as with unbuffered
systems).
* Subsystem Control Block enabled (see definition)
* Enhanced Vital Product Data support. Allows software (LAN Network
Manager, LAN Mgmt Utilities/2) to obtain a unique serial number
(identifier) on the processor complex which is in ROM (like Base 3). Also
provides unique ID (model/submodel), type/model/ serial number,
manufacturing ID, planar FRU number, and planar part number.
* Synchronous Channel Check support (see definition).
* Data bus parity support (definition below).
* A logging facility is provided (for ECC or system errors).

DEFINITIONS
Subsystem Control Block provides for the enhanced transfer of command, data,
and status information between busmasters (and between busmasters and the
system processor) to give increased performance. Capabilities such as command
chaining, data chaining, and block data moves frees the processor from waiting
for command completion before issuing the next command and frees the processor
for other tasks while a busmaster operates in parallel. Adapters and device
drivers must support this feature (many do today).

Synchronous Channel Check support provides for the signaling of errors
synchronously with the transfer in progress. Adapters and device drivers must
be designed to support this feature (none do today).

Data bus parity support provides for the verification of correct data as it is
transferred between the processor and memory and over the Micro Channel. All
data moved between individual components on the Processor Complex use this
feature (processor, memory controller DMA, Micro Channel controller). IBM's
Token-Ring LANStreamer MC 32, Auto LANStreamer MC 32, Dual LANStreamer MC 32,
EtherStreamer MC 32, Dual EtherStreamer MC 32, SCSI-2 Fast/Wide Adapter/A,
SCSI-2 RAID Controller, SCSI-2 RAID Adapter/A, and TURBOWAYS 100 ATM Adapter
support this feature.

IBM 32 bit MCA busmasters that support 40 MB/sec streaming:
+Token-Ring LANStreamer MC 32, Auto LANStreamer MC 32, Dual LANStreamer MC 32
+EtherStreamer MC 32, Dual EtherStreamer MC 32
+SCSI-2 Fast/Wide Adapter/A
+SCSI-2 RAID Controller (in 95 A), SCSI-2 F/W Strm RAID Adapter/A
+All FDDI Micro Channel adapters
+3515 Adapter/A (actually supports 80 MB/sec if bus supports it)
+3514 Array Adapter (for external 3514 RAID 5 Array)
+ARTIC960 Co-processor Adapter (actually supports 80 MB/sec)
+TURBOWAYS 100 ATM Adapter
+Ethernet Quad PeerMaster Server Adapters (80 MB/sec)


Q) 1.3 What are the IBM brand MCA cards?

These are usually denoted with a /A suffix. Here is a list of what is
current.

See Appendix A for full list.


Q) 1.4 Where do I get a Reference Disk for my PS/2?
[Rewrite by Aron Eisenpress ]

Reference Disks can be downloaded from two IBM sources, via ftp to
ftp.pc.ibm.com or by dialing the IBM PC Co. BBS at 1-919-517-0001. The same
reference disk files are available from both sources, but the BBS also has
many other files, such as product announcements, reference and configuration
information, some shareware and employee written programs, and many OS/2
related files.

Via ftp, follow these steps:
o Ftp to ftp.pc.ibm.com and log in as "anonymous" with your e-mail address
as the password.
o Select the "pub" directory, type: cd pub [enter]
o Select the "pccbbs" directory, type: cd pccbbs [enter]
o If you don't know which file you need, look in allfiles.txt in the pub
directory; which includes short descriptions (also in this FAQ).
o The Reference Disk files are in the refdisks directory, type cd refdisks.
o Set transfer mode to binary, type bin [enter]
o Get the file you need, type get RFxxxxxxx.DSK (or whatever filename)
o If the Filename ends in .DSK you will need LDF.COM and if it ends in .TG0
you will need TGSFX.COM.
o Get back to the pub directory, type: cd .. [enter], cd .. [enter]
o Go to the UTILS directory, type cd UTILS [enter]
o Type: bin press return and then type: get LDF.COM or get TGSFX.COM [enter]

Via the BBS, follow these steps:
o Log on to the IBM PC Co. BBS at 1-919-517-0001. Follow instructions until
you get to the main menu. Type REF DISKS, read the agreement and answer
it. Now you have access to directories 27 (ref disks) and 32 assuming you
agreed.
o Type D to download then enter the filename. Also LDF.COM or TGSFX.COM as
outlined in the ftp directions.

After the files are obtained:

For .DSK files:
o Run LDF.COM so that the files LOADDSKF.EXE and PRODAID.TXT are
extracted. LOADDSKF.EXE is what you need, PRODAID.TXT is the IBM
agreement.
o Insert a blank disk and type LOADDSKF filename.DSK A: (or B:) [/F to format
and /C to convert a 720KB image to a 1.44MB disk.]
o Ensure the proper disk is inserted and answer: "Y".
o Your reference disk is ready to go.

For .TG0 files:
o Run TGSFX.COM so that the files TELEGET.EXE and TGCONFIG.EXE are
extracted.
o Run TGCONFIG and follow the prompts.

For more information on this procedure:
o On ftp, cd to UTILS and get DSK.HLP.
o On BBS, type HELP and read the instructions.

One other common source from dealers or IBM is the IBM "Technical Connection
Personal Systems" CDROM. Some offices also have one (a good sign is if there
are a lot of PS/2s in your office). It also includes some files unavailable
from the on-line sources.

Also check http://www3.ncr.com/support/pc/pcdesc/library/adfs.shtml

Also QBMCA on http://members.aol.com/mcapage0/mcaindex.htm can tell you what
ADF you need.


Q) 1.5 Which file is my Reference Disk? They are all cryptically written.

See Appendix B.


Q) 1.6 What does the Reference Disk do?

The Reference Disk is your access to the internals of the PS/2, much like
accessing CMOS on other computers. From the Reference Disk you can add
options, change the time and date, set up a configuration, check SCSI device,
change the settings of the options you added and test your system for
problems. Once you have the Reference Disk running go to the Main Menu and
Backup the Reference Disk and take one copy BEFORE you add options to it and
put it in a safe place.


Q) 1.7 I hear there is more diagnostics hidden on the Reference Disk,
where are they?

This little known command allows one to test the system one test at a time.
This is useful if the system hangs or gets an error early in the full-test. To
access the Advanced Diagnostics press -A from the Reference Disk Main
Menu and it will allow you to select which test to perform after verifying the
present configuration. Also these are more through tests and also offer hard
drive formatting options and some wrap plug port tests (see Q6.6 for details).


Q) 1.8 Why can't I copy my Reference Disk, I want to make a backup?

You can by selecting the option to backup the Reference Disk from the
Reference Disk Main Menu. The files are written in a special way to the disk
and only the Reference Disk and LOADDSKF can create new/backup Reference Disks
unless a total disk copy program is used to copy the hidden files, DISKCOPY
works.


Q) 1.9 I got the Reference Disk, but now it is saying I need an Option
Diskette/or giving me a 165 error at POST...What are Option Diskettes
and Where do I get them?

Option Diskettes are the .ADF files that allow the PS/2 to communicate
properly with installed options and the 165 error code is also saying that the
proper .ADF file was not used to configure the system. The BBS and
ftp.pc.ibm.com both have all the IBM option diskettes and some common third
party ones. A file index of all the files on the ftp site can be obtained by
getting the FILES.TXT file which has 100k of disk name and descriptions of
every disk IBM included with option, computers, and devices as well as some
third party software. When you get the right one go to Copy an Option
Diskette in the Reference Disk Main Menu and it should do the work for you.
Now just configure the system and you should be set.


Q) 1.10 I got the Option Diskette, but the Reference Diskette is telling me
no option files can be found, What am I doing wrong?

Nothing usually. Sometimes the Reference Disk can not copy the proper files,
so look in the manual for the device and see what file(s) must be copied
manually over to the Reference Disk. As always use a backup copy of the Ref
Disk.


Q) 1.11 I bought my PS/2 second hand who can I get technical support from?

IBM. The 800-772-2227 (1-800-PS2-2227) is open 24 hours a day for warrantied
systems; however; there is no PS/2 models still under warranty so you will
have to use the 1-900-555-2582 number. They bill at $1.99 per minute the last
time I called (10/27/98). Usually the staff is dead accurate and only rarely
is misinformation handed out. However, the chances of misinformation is
greatly increased when calling during non-standard EST business hours as I
have experienced at 3am calls from the East Coast.

It seems lately I have been getting emails for people who have called the 900
number, but could not get there questions answered. This is not to fault IBM,
it simply is not practical to train your people on every machine released, but
do I get to collect the 900 charges you the questions I answer? :).


Q) 1.12 IBM tech. support says they do not know my answer now what?

Well if they didn't connect you to the premium support section ask to be
connected there. The Premium (I think that is what they call it) support
techs are usually a lot more adept at in-depth tech help, but sometimes the
normal tech does not connect you to them when you have a more advanced
problem so ask for them if you feel the person helping you is lost (usually
symbolized by a lot of being put on hold 'while I find out the answer' type
responses). Also it is a good idea to always call back later to double
check on things that you are not totally comfortable with the given answer.
Since these calls are no longer free it may not be practical to call back.
Also I am not sure the still have normal and Premium support since the phone
support has changed to the 900 number system, but of course, you can always
email me.


Q) 1.13 Where can I find support on the internet?

9595
http://www.inwave.com/~ohlandl/

Adapter Description Files (ADFs)
http://www3.ncr.com/support/pc/pcdesc/library/adfs.shtml

THE COMPUTERCRAFT PS2 Resource Center
http://www.computercraft.com/docs/ps2sect.html

IBM Canada Ltd - Vintage PCs
http://www.can.ibm.com/helpware/vintage.html

IBM PCs Tech Library
http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/cdt/hmm.html

IBM Link (last time I was there I could not find the PS/2 Info)
http://www.ibmlink.ibm.com/

MICROCHANNEL ENTHUSIASTS PAGE / INDEX
http://members.aol.com/mcapage0/mcaindex.htm

NeoInteractive MotherBoard Upgrades
http://www.neointeractive.com/

PS/2 Page | Main
http://members.tripod.com/~ps2page/

PSINFO
http://www.co.umist.ac.uk/~ch/psinfo/psinfo.1.toc.html


Q) 1.14 I got an IBM MCA card with no labeling, How do I tell what it is?

This is a big problem with IBM cards. Most card manufacturers get label crazy
silk-screening their name and the card's name all over the card's
breadboard,yet IBM being the marketing giant doesn't need the extra production
step and goes with bare breadboards.

The first thing to do is to ground yourself (by touching the power supply of a
turned OFF computer is a good way) and try to set the card on an anti-static
bag or surface and try not to move around to much because one static charge to
a key area and it won't matter what the card is for. Then try and find out
what IBM part numbers (IBMPN) and FRU (Field Replacement Unit)(IBMFRU) are
listed on the front and back of the card. Contrary to popular belief you
cannot tell what the card does by these numbers as a class, i.e. not all
87Xxxxx cards are disk controllers and made in 1987. With all the numbers
written down place the card in a anti-static bag and store it carefully. Call
IBM at 1-800-772-2227 (or 900-555-2582 at $1.99/min) and ask them first.
Chances are if the card is over two years old it is going to be a gamble at
best. If they could not help, it is time to post your problem to
comp.sys.ibm.ps2.hardware for answers. Try to render an ASCII image of the
card to give people an idea of what it is and this might also help someone
identify it on the spot.

Also the FCC# could be used as it almost never changes and is unique for each
card. The FCC website is www.fcc.gov/oet/fccid. There is also SBS Direct's
FCC ID Look-up at www.sbsdirect.com/fccenter.html. Lately these have proven
excellent resorts though sometimes the descriptions given are vague you at
least will know the manufacturer and purpose of the card.

Another method though I believe you need to have it installed and configured
is a program on PC-DOS 6.3 which takes the 'electronic name' (POSID, a four
digit
number) of the MCA card and gives the description.

And of course, QBMCA on http://members.aol.com/mcapage0/mcaindex.htm.

Another utility that reports on the POSID from MS-DOS is Snooper on
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jvias/snoop344.zip.


S) 2.0 Motherboards

Q) 2.1 Where can I find a PS/2 motherboard?

PS/2 last a long time, but sometimes due to mother nature, the user or just
age the motherboards (planar boards in IBM-speak) fail. These can be obtained
in many places both new and used. Beware that the price of a new motherboard
is steep from IBM. Some third-party dealers have them much cheaper than in the
past. DakTech carries them still in either new or as good as new form with a
warranty, the Model 80-Axx series 25MHz motherboard with cache was only $99
(10/27/98), there number is 800-325-3238. Used motherboards could be obtained
from Page Computers 800-886-0055 for a reasonable price ($139.00 for a Model
80-Axx w/ 90 day warranty). I have bought two boards from them and have had
no problems with either. The people working there are normally ex-IBM PS/2
people who know a lot more than your average computer salvage types. True
Blue Parts 508-833-2225 (trueblueparts@mindspring.com) formally Micro Mart has
the Model 80-Axx board for only $60. Your best bet in general is to pick up a
Computer Shopper and scan the pages for PS/2 stuff and put the numbers in a
easy to find database (and also send new numbers found to me for FAQ
additions) so that whenever a problem arises you can look up the company that
sells what you need.


Q) 2.2 Instead of a 'stock' motherboard can I get a more advanced board?

Reply Technologies sold new PS/2-type motherboards much cheaper than the IBM
versions. These were high priced compared to normal PC-Clone motherboards,
but if you have cash in memory and PS/2 proprietary items it is cheaper than
replacing everything with new ISA/VLB/PCI based equipment. Also they offered
Pentium processors, the ability to use standard SIMMs, and even VLB. These
are still available used and new from certain vendors, www.neointeractive.com
is one such dealer. The types of motherboards available from IBM are the
486DX2/66 and 486BL2/66, and almost every 486 type from Reply Technologies.
The IBM motherboards are only available from the Boulder Surplus Parts
division and are limited as they are no longer being made. Also they were
made only for the 60, 65SX, 70 and 80.

There is a model 50/50Z and 55SX/LS planar board upgrade to 486SLC2/50
available currently from IBM. Note: these were discontinued in Sept 94 so
they are limited, if IBM Direct doesn't have them call Boulder.

There are two versions of Reply's motherboards: the TurboBoard (for models 30,
50/50Z, 55SX, and 70) and the PowerBoard (for models 25/25-286, 30-286,
50/50Z, 55SX, 56 and 57, and 70). Using the model 70 as the example, the
TurboBoard ($25.00) offers a 486SLC2 25/50 CPU, 387SX FPU socket, 16MB max
using 3 70ns parity SIMMs, on board 1MB DRAM video, and 3 16 bit slots (one
with video extension). The PowerBoard ($95 with 486DX2/66) offers 486DX2/66,
486DX4/100, or 586/100 with Intel Overdrive socket, 64MB max using 3 70ns
parity SIMMs, on-board 1MB (2MB+$25) 64 bit local bus video, two 32 bit and
one 16 bit (with video extension) slots. This is not a bad way to go.
Processor upgrades are $25 for 486DX4/100 and $50 for 586/100.

The latest prices are as of 10/27/98 from Neointeractive
(www.neointeractive.com).


Q) 2.3 Will a standard motherboard work in a PS/2?

No...unless you are VERY lucky(and probably the only one in the world). Most
times the screw holes will not even come close, then the slots will be way
off. Even if you got it fastened into your case you would need a new power
supply (which you would have to screw in some how) and then new floppy drives
etc. You are better off selling the system and starting from scratch.


Q) 2.4 What motherboards come with a cache and are more up-to-date with
today's standards?

Well I am not going to be able to complete this section but the model 70 and
80s with a 25MHz processor (8570/8580-Axx) come with a 64k L2 cache which is
very helpful. Benchmarks on a 20MHz model 80 and 25MHz model 80 with the
cache showed Dhrystones at 4k for the 20MHz and at 7.7k for the 25MHz which is
a bigger difference than the 5MHz should give by itself. As a matter of fact
a Cyrix DRx2-40 processor in a 20MHz machine gave only 8k Dhrystones, a cache
of some sort should always be obtained when purchasing a motherboard.


Q) 2.5 Which motherboards allow/prohibit additional on-board memory?

The following list shows what memory can be added. The difference of the Max
System and Max Mother is what must be installed in the form of an expansion
card.

Factory Max Max
Model Installed Mother System
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
16 BIT
35/40-all 2 16 16
50-021 1 2 16
50Z-031 1 8 16
50Z-061 2 8 16
53
55LS-LE0 4 8 16
55LS-LT0 4 8 16
55SX-031 4 8 16
55SX-041 4 8 16
55SX-061 4 8 16
55SX-081 4 8 16
56
57SX-045 4 16 16
57SX-049 4 16 16
60-041 1 1 16
60-071 1 1 16
65SX-061 2 8 16
65SX-121 2 8 16
65SX-321 2 8 16
32 BIT
70-061 2 6 16
70-081 4 6 16
70-121 2 6 16
70-161 4 6 16
70-A16 4 8 16
70-A21 2 6 16
70-A61 2 8 16
70-A81 4 8 16
70-E61 2 8 16
70 486-B21 2 8 16
70 486-B61 2 8 16
76
77
80-041 1 2 16
80-071 2 2 16
80-081 4 4 16
80-111 2 4 16
80-121 2 4 16
80-161 4 4 16
80-311 2 4 16
80-321 2 4 16
80-A16 4 8 16
80-A21 4 8 16
80-A31 4 8 16
90 XP 486-0J5 8 64 64
90 XP 486-0J9 8 64 64
90 XP 486-0KD 8 64 64
90 XP 486-0J5 8 64 64
90 XP 486SX-0G5 4 64 64
90 XP 486SX-0G9 4 64 64
90 XP 486SX-0H5 8 64 64
90 XP 486SX-0H9 8 64 64
90 XP 486SX-0K9 8 64 64
90 XP 486SX-0KF 8 64 64
95 XP 486-0G9 4 64 64
95 XP 486-0GF 4 64 64
95 XP 486-0J9 8 64 64
95 XP 486-0JD 8 64 64
95 XP 486-0JF 8 64 64
95 XP 486-0KD 8 64 64
95 XP 486SX-0H9 8 64 64
95 XP 486SX-0HD 8 64 64
PORTABLE
P70 386-031 2 8 16
P70 386-061 4 8 16
P70 386-121 4 8 16
P75 486-161 8 16 16
P75 486-401 8 16 16

According to Louis Ohland

Max mother is what can be physically added to the motherboard. Max
system is what can be added in the form of memory cards. Max
system is also the maximum memory of the mother and expansion card
combined.

To make it easier- The 90 / 95 machines do not support MME
(Matched Memory Extension) and therefor cannot accept add-on
memory cards.

With the advent of the type 4 complex, you have either 64MB max
with parity, or 256MB max with ECC (my 9595-OYT has 128MB..)(Maybe
someone can send me a Type 4 complex too :)).


Q) 2.6 Can I use normal 72-pin SIMMs? 30-pin SIMMs?

Nope, neither. There are reports of some using non-PS/2 72-pin SIMMs, but
these have not been verified by myself and also I suspect that they are
actually third party PS/2 SIMMs the user was unknowingly using.


Q) 2.7 How do I tell the speed of the PS/2 SIMMs I have now on my
motherboard?

Most of the times unless labeled it will be hard. IBM's numbering system
changes all the time and many times the cross-reference can not be made. I
got a SIMM here that has a nice label stating IBM 2M 85NS P/N 68X6127
FRU 92F0104. Now if that label were removed I would only have 89X8922 IBM9314
L46056PE on the 18 chips that are attached to the SIMM, now if someone can
make 2M or 85NS out of those three numbers I would be impressed as a call to
IBM showed it as not identifiable.

In OS/2 WARP there is a program that tells what is installed and the speed of
the SIMMs. This program is the system information utility. Although it would
be impractical for a large amount of unlabeled SIMMs, a few can be ID'ed this
way.

According to Louis Ohland :

The 9595 Type 4 (possibly type 3) can report in setup on the speed
and architecture (parity or ECC) of each chip by slot...


Q) 2.8 What speed SIMMs do I need?

Unlike buying clone motherboards, the speed of the SIMMs you should need will
usually be easily found out. For standard IBM, call IBM and for all other
motherboard makers they should include it in their motherboard docs. Most of
the time the 80ns memory is the most common on the newer machines. 120ns was
used on the older PS/2s (i.e. 50's and 60's) and most 386s at or less than
25MHz can get by with 85ns. If you upgrade to one of the new 486 replacement
386 CPUs you will probably need 80ns memory unless stated that it will work
with normal system memory, 70ns and faster is probably a good idea and should
be used as 80ns and slower memory is becoming obsolete.

From Louis Ohland :

The 9595 Type 4 (possibly type 3) can report in setup on the speed
and architecture (parity or ECC) of each chip by slot...


Q) 2.9 How good is MCA and what does it offer?

IBM is pushing the MCA bus again. It is possible to make it as fast as VLB,
it comes close now. The new 700 machines will offer a dual bus, MCA/PCI
which will give the best of both worlds. The *BEST* thing about MCA is it
usually offers the PLUG-and-PLAY everyone wants, at least in most cases. You
simply copy the .ADF files onto your reference disk then plug the new card in
and turn on your system. The computer will figure out where the card is and
configure it and for once you don't have to set 10 banks of 8 dipswitchs with
a pen :). Also it offers the best bus mastering out there. A MCA card can
totally take over all functions of the CPU and FPU and cause no interference
with the rest of the machine, also a MCA board can have its own CPU to do the
work of the peripheral it is attached. For example lets say you had a MCA
Video Toaster type card...it could be set up to allow you to configure certain
options, enter data, then have it process the data no matter how complex and
return to your normal machine and witness no slowdown at ALL. MCA allows card
functions to be totally independent and self-controlled.

A problem faced by ISA was device addresses, and ISA bus is only capable of
1024 device addresses while MCA can address 65,280. Also, MCA has far more
grounds along the bus preventing radio emission. Lastly, MCA can share
interrupts while ISA can not.

The speed of MCA is something underestimated by non-PS/2 users. It is a very
fast and quiet (as far as RF interference goes). Some specs are:

The maximum transfer rates on a 10 MHz MCA bus:

16 bit MCA 32 bit MCA
Normal transfers 10MBytes/sec 20 MBytes/sec
(adr/data)

Short Burst and Long
Streaming transfers 20MBytes/sec 40 MBytes/sec
(adr/data data data ..)

Multiplex Streaming (not available) 80 MBytes/sec
(as above and uses the
`idle' adr lines to
transfer data as well,
for a 64 bit transfer)

Matched Memory Cycle 21.3 MBytes/sec
(matched memory cycle
changes the timing of (32 MBytes/sec w/o
the MCA bus to 62.5 added wait state
nanosec. for a 187.5 at 62.5 Nanosec.
4 byte adr-wait-data and 40 MBytes/sec
transfer cycle. This with 50 nanosec
is on a 16MHz model timing)
80 as an example.)


[Originator: benker@hp-8.cae.wisc.edu]

Since there have been so many discussions about all of this, I'm posting the
OFFICIAL MCA specs. These are direct from IBM. MCA, as you will notice, has
the capability to be faster than even the local bus technologies with a
transfer rate of up to 160MB/sec. Hope all of this helps.

The basic transfer cycle on the Micro Channel is a minimum of 200ns (100ns
for the address and 100ns for the data which results in five million basic
transfer cycles per second for a device running in burst mode. As shown in
Figure "Basic Data Transfer Mode", a data transfer operation is done in two
steps. First the address for the transfer (either I/O adapter or memory
location) is selected, then up to four bytes of data is moved across the data
buffer.

Depending of the width of the data path (8, 16, or 32 bits) the instantaneous
data transfer rate on the channel would be 5, 10, or 20MB per second. The
matched-memory extension is a modification to the basic data transfer mode,
which can improve the data transfer capabilities between the system master and
channel-attached memory. When supported, it allows the basic transfer cycle
of 200ns to be reduced.

The DMA controller on the system board requires two basic transfer cycles to
move either 8 bits or 16 bits of data. It moves the data from the originator
to a buffer in the DMA controller and then to the target device or memory
location. Because two cycles are used per 8 or 16 bits of data, the data
transfer rate for DMA controllers is 2.5MB or 5MB per second. For blocks of
sequential data transferred over the Micro Channel, it should not be necessary
to specify the address information more than once. Both the source and
destination devices should update the address for each cycle by the size of
the transferred data. This technique is supported by the Micro Channel and is
known as streaming data mode (or streaming data procedure). Using streaming
data mode with 32 bit transfer, the effective transfer rate is 40MB per
second. The usage of the address and data buses during a data transfer using
streaming data procedure is shown in Figure "Streaming Data Mode".

When the Micro Channel is running in streaming data mode, the 32 address lines
are only used during the first cycle of the transfer. These address lines are
therefore available for transfer of an additional four bytes during each
following cycle. This mode is called multiplexed streaming data mode and
gives an effective width of 64 bits (8 bytes) for each cycle. The resulting
effective data rate is 80MB per second. This is shown in Figure "Multiplexed
Streaming Data Mode".

PS/2 Model 9595 (and possibly the 8595) can support the 100ns basic transfer
cycle with the SCSI Fast/Wide adapterrather than the current 200ns. With the
current cycle the Micro Channel is able to transfer sequential blocks of data
with transfer rates of 20, 40, and 80MB per second.

Systems implementing the faster transfer cycle would be able to reach transfer
speeds of up to 160MB per second. These rates are essential for advanced
function bus masters, which must move large blocks of sequential data.


Q) 2.10 Which is better, ISA/EISA/VLB/PCI/etc?

[From: ralf@wpi.wpi.edu (Ralph Valentino)]
[updated: alkemyst@shadow.net 10/23/94]

Here is a quick overview of the various bus architectures available for the PC
and some of the strengths and weaknesses of each. Some terms are described in
more detail at the bottom.

XT bus: Bus originally used in the IBM XT.
8 data bits, 20 address bits
4.77 MHz

Comments: Obsolete, very similar to ISA bus, many XT cards will work in
ISA slots.

ISA bus: Industry Standard Architecture bus (a.k.a. AT bus)
8/16 data bits, 24 address bits (16Meg addressable)
8-8.33MHz, asynchronous
5.55M/s burst
bus master support
edge triggered TTL interrupts (IRQs) - no sharing
low cost

Comments: Ideal for low to mid bandwidth cards, though lack of IRQs can
quickly become annoying.

MCA bus: Micro Channel Architecture bus
16/32 data bit, 32 address bits
10-20MHz, up to 40MHz could be possible, asynchronous
80M/s burst, synchronous
full bus master capability
good bus arbitration
auto configurable
IBM proprietary (not ISA/EISA/VLB compatible)

Comments: Since MCA was proprietary, EISA was formed to compete with it.
EISA gained much more acceptance; MCA is all but dead.

EISA bus: Enhanced Industry Standard Architecture bus
32 data bits, 32 address bits
8-8.33MHz, synchronous
32M/s burst (sustained)
full bus master capability
good bus arbitration
auto configurable
sharable IRQs, DMA channels
backward compatible with ISA
some acceptance outside of the PC architecture
high cost

Comments: EISA is great for high bandwidth bus mastering cards such as
SCSI host adapters, but its high cost limits its usefulness for
Other types of cards. Very commonly used in servers.

VLB: VESA Local Bus
32 data bits, 32 address bits
25-40MHz, asynchronous
130M/s burst (sustained is closer to 32M/s)
bus master capability
will coexist with ISA/EISA
slot limited to 2 or 3 cards typical
backward compatible with ISA
moderate cost

Comments: VLB is great for video cards, but its lack of a good bus arbiter
limits its usefulness for bus mastering cards and its moderate
cost limits its usefulness for low to mid bandwidth cards.
Since it can coexist with EISA/ISA, a combination of all three
types of cards usually works best.

PCI: Peripheral Component Interconnect
32 data bits (64 bit option), 32 address bits (64 bit option)
up to 33MHz, synchronous
120M/s burst (sustained) (240M/s with 64 bit option)
full bus master capability
good bus arbitration
up to 6 peripherals
auto configurable
will coexist with ISA/EISA/MCA as well as another PCI bus
strong acceptance outside of the PC architecture
moderate cost

Comments: Combines the speed of VLB with the advanced arbitration of EISA.
Great for both video cards and bus mastering SCSI/network cards.

VL 2.0: Video Local Bus version 2.0
64 data bits, multiplexing and data buffering
up to 50MHz
est. 400M/s burst
full bus mastering
good bus arbitration
specification not completed yet

=Terms=

Auto configurable: Allows software to identify the board's requirements and
resolve any potential resource conflicts (IRQ/DMA/address
/BIOS/etc).

Bus master support: Capable of First Party DMA transfers.

Full bus master capability: Can support any First Party cycle from any
device, including another CPU.

Good bus arbitration: Fair bus access during conflicts, no need to back off
unless another device needs the bus. This prevents
CPU starvation while allowing a single device to use
100% of the available bandwidth. Other buses let a
card hold the bus until it decides to release it and
attempts to prevent starvation by having an active
card voluntarily release the bus periodically ("bus on
time") and remain off the bus for a period of time
("bus off time") to give other devices, including the
CPU, a chance even if they don't want it.

16Meg addressable: This limits first party DMA transfers to the lower 16 Meg
of address space. There are various software methods to
overcome this problem when more than 16 Megs of main
memory are available. This has no effect on the ability
of the processor to reach all of main memory.

Backward compatible with ISA: Allows you to place an ISA card in the slot of
a more advanced bus. Note, however, that the
ISA card does not get any benefit from being
In an advanced slot, instead, the slot reverts
To an ISA slot. Other slots are unaffected.

The MCA specs at 10MHz show sustained throughput very close to VLB and 20MHz
MCA specs should be equal or superior to VLB, however, usually MCA cards do
not operate at these faster speeds of 20MHz.

TIME LINE

8088 8086 286 386 486 586
**
VL2
***
PCI2
*********
PCI1
***********
VL1
*********************************
EISA
***************************************
MCA
*********************************************************
AT bus
*****************
PC bus


1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993


Q) 2.11 Will an ISA card work in an MCA (PS/2) machine?

No, they will not. MCA, unlike EISA and VLB, is not backward compatible with
ISA.


Q) 2.12 How do I enter the CMOS configuration menu?

If it is possible on your machine it is Ctrl-Alt-Ins after Ctrl-Alt-Del. If
nothing happens when you hit Ctrl-Alt-Ins at the prompt then you must use the
reference disk to change CMOS values.

From Louis Ohland :
With the type 4 complex, you can hit Escape for quick boot (bypass memory
check)
and/or hit F1 to run setup.


Q) 2.13 What is bus mastering anyway?

Bus mastering is the ability of the MCA card to directly read and write to
main memory. This allows the CPU do delegate I/O work out to the cards,
freeing it to do other things. If you want a bus mastering card, you should
specifically request it and expect to pay more. Also not all cards are
available in bus mastering form due to the fact that they do not have to be
independent to the rest of the system, and some because they can't be
independent.


S) 3.0 IO controllers/interfaces

Q) 3.1 How do FM/IDE/MFM/RLL/ESDI/SCSI interfaces work?

Ok, first FM, MFM, and RLL refer to the data encoding. Almost all drives
today are RLL. IDE, ESDI, and SCSI are types of interfaces and the drives
that run on them. The descriptions below will contain a lot of techno-babble
to most, but the purpose of this is to give an idea how they work and in that
capacity the text below should suffice. UPGRADING AND REPAIRING PC'S by Scott
Mueller describes this much better as that is the purpose of his book, not
this FAQ.

FM, or Frequency Modulation, was the earliest scheme. Known as Single Density
by many because of the floppies it was originally used on. This was popular
in the 1970's, but with a limit of about 80k it quickly died out.

It is the simplest way to encode zeros and ones. Also to prevent sync errors
in long streams of zeros or ones, two transition cells are used per bit. A
data cell representing the zero or one and a clock cell representing what
amounts to the position or record. In a data transition cell, either a one
bit is recorded to indicate a flux reversal or a zero bit to indicate none.
The clock cell is used for each bit also. So each time you change bits, the
clock cell reverses flux. This works great except for the fact that you lose
half your storage capability since each data bit requires two flux reversals,
one for the data and one for the clock.

Example of FM Data to Flux Transitions
Data Bit Flux encoding
1 TT
0 TN

T=flux transition
N=no flux transition


MFM, or Modified Frequency Modulation was created to reduce this overhead and
compact more data into the same space. This was done by reducing clock
transition cells. A clock transition cell is only recorded if a zero bit is
preceded by a zero bit. This amounts to twice the efficiency and is why MFM
became known as Double Density (as did the disks which were originally
formatted this way). It is still used in almost all PC floppy drives today.
MFM is also twice as fast as FM.

Example of MFM Data to Flux Transitions
Data Bit Flux encoding
1 NT (no clock cell encoding)
0 preceded by 0 TN (clock cell encoded)
0 preceded by 1 NN (no clock cell encoded)


RLL, or Run Length Limited, is today's method of choice. RLL stores 50% more
data than MFM and three times the data of FM. In RLL, groups of bits are
taken as a whole and combined to generate a pattern of flux reversals. By
combining the clock and data cells into these patterns, the clock rate can be
increase while keeping the same distance of transitions on the disk.

RLL was invented by IBM first for mainframes, but by the 80's this technology
flowed into the desktop PC's of the day and is still a viable encoded scheme.
RLL gets its name from the two main functions of the patterns stored. One is
the minimum number (the run length) and maximum number (the run limit) of
transition cells allowed between two actual flux transitions. There are
several schemes to this, but RLL 2,7 and RLL 1,7 are the most popular with 1,7
used almost exclusively in all large drives.

Using RLL 2,7 as the example, the numbering scheme is based on the fact that
there can be as few as 2 and as many as 7 transition cells separating two flux
transitions. Also, FM and MFM can be referred by RLL naming conventions as RLL
0,1 and RLL 1,3, respectively, however when they are discussed it is still by
there original FM and MFM names.

Example of RLL 2,7 Data to Flux transitions
(Using IBM's ENDEC (ENcode/DECode) table only as there can be unlimited
variations to this encoding scheme)
Data Flux encoding
10 NTNN
11 TNNN
000 NNNTNN
010 TNNTNN
011 NNTNNN
0010 NNTNNTNN
0011 NNNNTNNN

Example of the character "X" (01011000 in binary) showing the actual way it is
encoded on disk.
FM: Bit .0.1.0.1.1.0.0.0
Flux TNTTTNTTTTTNTNTN 11 transitions
MFM: Bit .0.1.0.1.1.0.0.0
Flux TNNTNNNTNTNNTNTN 6 transitions (50% of FM)
RLL 2,7: Bit .0.1.0.1.1.0.0.0
Flux TNNTNNTNNNNNNTNN 4 transitions (30% of FM)
T=Transition flux, N=No Transition flux, and .=data bit boundary.

Also there is a new encoding scheme called PRML, Partial-Response,
Maximum-Likelihood that compacts data a further 40%. This uses DSP technology
to clean the signal of noise and allow data to be stored closer together,
whereas the other three still have the same density of flux transitions.

Now on to interfaces. There are a few: ST-506/412, ESDI, IDE, and SCSI as
well as the variations of each (SCSI-2, ATA-2, etc). The interface transmits
and receives data to and from the drive. Only the ST-506/412 and ESDI are
true disk-controller to drive interfaces. SCSI and IDE are system level
interfaces usually containing ST-506/412 or ESDI internally. SCSI adds an
extra level of interface that attaches directly to the system bus whereas IDE
is a direct bus interface.

ST-506/412 - developed by Seagate back around the beginning of the 80's and is
named after the 5MB ST-506 drive and 10MB ST-412 drive originally attached to
this interface. This was the interface of choice for almost all drive
manufacturers during this time period. Also interestingly enough all drives
using this interface were plug-and-play as long as the BIOS on the system
board supported the drive (when the IBM AT was introduced IBM removed the BIOS
off the ST-506/412 interface and included it into the IBM AT system BIOS).
This interface is obsolete by today's standards, though it endured a long time
for an interface designed around a 5MB drive which at the end of its life was
connected to drives as large as 233MB! Using two Drive Select (DS) channels
you could have up to two drives attached to this controller, DS1 was the C
drive and DS2 was D.

ESDI, Enhanced Small Device Interface - developed in the early 80's by Maxtor
to succeed the ST-506/412 standard and provide more performance and later
adopted by ANSI. Offered enhanced reliability by incorporating a ENDEC into
the drive. Capable of 24 megabits/sec, though limited to 10-15 megabits/sec
by almost all drives. ESDI drives were not always compatible with other ESDI
drives due to implementation deviations between manufacturers and this opened
the way for the IDE standard which though slower was much cheaper to produce.


ESDI also allowed for automatic drive configuration and defect mapping
(sometimes). Also mostly compatible with the ST-506/412 interface in that if
the system supported one, it usually would the other. Sometimes additional
software would need to be run (for auto defect mapping as an example).

IDE, Integrated Drive Electronics - a generic term for any drive with built-in
controller electronics. Though more often applied to ATA (AT Attachment)
drives and is an ANSI standard. These were originally exclusively Hardcards
where a small 3.5" ST-506/412 or ESDI drive was mounted directly to the
controller card. More reliability due to the lack of ribbon cables and
reduced noise.

Although the IDE cable ports are on the motherboards of today's computers, the
actual controller is still in the drive. The port is only used to connect the
controller to the bus and is actually a 40 pin subset of a 98 pin ISA slot.
Having the controller built-in to each drive is why many times IDE drives
don't work together. Both controllers compete to be the Master despite
assigning it a Slave status sometimes. The usual workaround is to use IDE
drives by the same manufacturer and also of the same specification.

PS/2 content: in 1987 IBM offered IDE drives for MCA machines called MCA IDE
(a 16 bit device like ATA IDE). These were connected to the bus thorough an
interposer card and needed only a few buffer chips and almost no circuitry
which is why they are referred to as paddle boards by many (game
paddle/joystick boards have very little circuitry also). An 8 bit variation
made it into the non-Microchannel Model 30 similar to XT IDE.

IDE drives offer the highest performance at any cost for a single user, single
tasking operating system.

ATA-1 was introduced in 1989 and ATA-2 (EIDE by Western Digital and Fast-ATA
and Fast-ATA-2 by Seagate and Quantum) in 1995.

ATA-2 allows for drives larger than 504MB by translation (basically altering
the perceived geometry of a drive to other programs which cannot handle more
than 1024 cylinders. A 2000 cylinder drive with 16 heads would be translated
as a 1000 cylinder drive with 32 heads). Translation methods rely on an
enhanced BIOS and are known as Standard CHS (Cylinder Head Sector), Extended
CHS or Large, LBA (Logical Block Addressing).

It also allows faster data transfers with PIO (programmed Input Output) modes.
Mode 0 has a 600ns cycle time and limits transfers to 3.3MB/sec. At its best
ATA-1 had a 240ns cycle time and transfer rate of 8.3MB/sec. With ATA-2 in
PIO mode 3 with its 180ns cycle time, transfer rates go to 11.1 and with mode
4 and a 120ns cycle the rate is 16.6MB/sec. This implementation requires the
port to be a local bus port (VLB or PCI). Also despite support for two drives
usually only the primary can support up to mode 4, the secondary is actually
connected through the ISA bus and is limited to mode 2.

DMA (direct memory access) can also be used to exclude the CPU from the drive
to bus transfers using the system boards DMA controller to handle the
transactions. Busmastering DMA controllers use their own DMA controller to
handle this and because of the extra complexity it drives up the cost. DMA is
never used efficiently with an ISA bus, but with today's PCI boards speeds of
33MB/sec are now common.

SCSI, Small Computer System Interface - not really a disk interface, but a
system-level interface. SCSI is a bus that supports up to eight devices. One
of these is the host adapter and the gateway between the SCSI and PC buses.
The SCSI bus does not talk directly to the devices either, but to each devices
controller built into it (Most SCSI drives are actually IDE drives with SCSI
bus adapter circuits added. Each device is given a SCSI ID. Up to 4 host
adapters can be supported by most systems and with each able to control 7
other peripherals that gives a total of 28 devices. Some newer SCSI
implementations can support 15 devices per bus.

The SCSI standard like ESDI is a hardware standard. It does not specify how
communication is to be handled and as a result some SCSI devices are not
compatible with others. Scanners and some CD-ROMS fall into these category as
they do not include the BIOS for self-booting hard drives.

There are several implementations of SCSI.

SCSI-1 included many features and commands, but listed them as optional so
many were not used causing incompatibility galore. SCSI-1 was limited to
5MB/sec transfers. SCSI-1 devices were 8 bit.

SCSI-2 fixed this by requiring 18 commands to be coded, a Common Command Set
(CCS). SCSI-2 also brought support for CD-ROMS, tape drives, and other
devices. There was Fast SCSI-2 and a 16 bit version called Wide SCSI-2.

Fast synchronous SCSI and Wide SCSI were an optional specifications and raised
the transfer rate to 10MB/sec when each was used by itself. However, fast and
wide can be combined and raise transfer rates to 20MB/sec. There was also a
32 bit specification defined, but was not implemented as being too expensive.


Q) 3.2 How can I tell if I have MFM/RLL/ESDI/IDE/SCSI?

Open the computer and check the model number of the drive and contact the
manufacturer is the only way to be 100% certain in many cases.

That aside, the first thing to check is the number of pins on the drive's
connector(s) and how many cables you have. The second thing to check is the
CMOS setup, assuming, of course, that it is in a working system.

ST-506/412 = two or three cables (1 drive or 2 drives): two 20 pin, and one
34 pin if two drives are connected (do not attempt to connect an
ESDI drive to these cables, although it will attach the signals
are different).

17 (MFM) or 26 (RLL) sectors per track.

One 34 pin cable is daisy-chained between up to two drives much
like floppies, though due to different twist in the cable they
are not interchangeable. Many of these interfaces include a
provision for connecting floppies though.

A terminating resistor is used if only one drive is connected.

ESDI = 2 cables: 34 pin and a 20 pin (as stated in the ST-506/412 section both

the 34 and 20 pin are identical in looks to the cables that are used
with
the ST-506/412 interface, but do not connect a MFM or RLL drive to this

interface).

usually set up as type #1 in the CMOS and auto-configured at boot time

32 sectors per track or more and almost always 1:1 interleave giving
up to 1MB/sec transfer capability.

IDE = 1 cable: 40 pins with three pin-header style connectors on it. One
plugs into the IDE interface connector and the other far end into the
primary drive (usually...sometimes this is the secondary), followed by
the secondary being connected in the middle (again it is possible the
primary is in the middle).

Sectors, heads and tracks are variable.

CMOS does not determine accurately.

SCSI-1 = 1 cable: 50 pins
SCSI-2 = 1 cable: 68 pins
PS/2 uses 60 pins so I am not sure if there is a way to tell between

SCSI-1 and SCSI-2 on a PS/2

Aftermarket controllers use the standard 50 pin and some use the
Apple
SCSI connector for external drives.

usually set up as "not installed" in the CMOS


Q) 3.3 Why won't my two hard drives work together?

IDE: (Assuming the user has determined that the Master/Slave arrangements are
correct). IDE drives of different makes may just be incompatible, likewise
occasionally different models of the same manufacturer are. Try two identical
drives, swapping master and slave, or trying a combination of a third drive
with any of the other two and the problem should usually cease.

SCSI: (Again assuming the user understands how to configure a SCSI adapter).
If using SCSI-1 spec drives, there just may be incompatibilities between them,
try another drive preferably of the same manufacturer or better yet an
identical drive. With later SCSI specifications, chances are something is not
terminated or ID'd properly. Try changing the order.


Q) 3.4 How do I install a second controller?

Simply pull it in and boot with the reference disk and viola. Of course it is
never this easy. Occasionally some controllers are incompatible with one
another and it is impossible to get them to work together. For this reason
try to keep controllers identical (use the same manufacturer at the very
least).


Q) 3.5 Which is better, SCSI or IDE or ESDI?

Again like the MCA versus ISA/EISA/VLB/PCI debate. There is what is better in
theory and what is better in real life. ESDI is a dead standard with much
faster and larger capacity, cheaper IDE drives out there, though it had the
possibility of being the fastest. Unfortunately in the PS/2 arena you usually
can't chose IDE which with the newer versions offers almost all of the speed
of the best SCSI drives and still is the fastest single user, single task OS
drive there is. SCSI, however, with multitasking operating systems shines,
especially the later Fast/Wide standards. Though I do not know of any PS/2
controller capable of the 40MB/sec and 80MB/sec of today's top SCSI drives the
10-20MB/sec performance is more than enough for many desktops.


Q) 3.6 Can MFM/RLL/ESDI/IDE and SCSI coexist?

The PC is limited to two drive controllers total. SCSI, however, is a "host
adapter" and not a drive controller. To the rest of your system, it appears
more like an Ethernet card than a drive controller. For this reason, SCSI will
always be able to coexist with any type dive controller. The main drawback
here is that on most systems, you must boot off a disk on the primary drive
controller, if you have one. That means if you have SCSI and IDE in your
system, for example, you can not directly boot from the SCSI drive. There are
various ways to get around this limitation, including the use of a boot
manager.

MFM and RLL are the methods of writing the data to the disk and as such almost
always exist together (MFM for the floppy drives and RLL for the fixed disks).


Q) 3.7 What's the difference between SCSI and SCSI-2? Are they compatible?

The main difference between SCSI and SCSI-2 are some new minor features that
the average person will never notice. Both run at a maximum 5MB/s. Though
Fast and Wide SCSI-2 double this speed and can be combined to quadruple it.
All versions of SCSI will work together (SCSI-1 in compatible with SCSI-1 only
in theory as there was no set command set, however, I have never experienced
such an incompatibility). On power up, the SCSI host adapter and each
device(separately) determine the best command set and the speed that each is
capable of.

For more information on this, refer to the comp.periphs.scsi FAQ.


Q) 3.8 Can I use a non-IBM ESDI in a PS/2?

[From: helling@uwindsor.ca ]

FORMATTING A NON_IBM ESDI DRIVE FOR A PS/2 80.

Well, it might have been impossible for me to put a simple MFM
hard drive into my model 80 PS/2, 4M, model 8580-111, but I
did get a NON-IBM ESDI drive installed, using a PS/2 ESDI
controller, and the following patched version of LLFORMAT.COM,
usually found on the 7080 reference disk....

First: a rumor that the following PS/2 80's LIKE MFM and ESDI:
041,071,111,311
and the following, which supposedly came with SCSI don't...
121, 161, possibly AXX...
This is unconfirmed, and mine is a 111, so it worked....

1) In dos, go to your ref disk, make a directory called SPARE,
copy LLFORMAT.COM to it (nice safe backup copy)
1a) Copy the dos DEBUG.EXE program onto the ref disk...

Now follow this, paying attention to my comments...
>>>> comment O mine....
---------------------------- QUOTING ---------------------------
: >3. This DEBUG procedure has been documented by Tillman Schmidt of
: > Koeln, Germany following the translation of an article in the
: > German c't Magazin fr Computertechnik, issue 5/1991, page 272f.

The reference-disk comes with a program to low-level-format a hard disk:
LLFORMAT.COM; boot from the reference-disk and press CTRL-A in the main menu
to get a menu for extended diagnose. To low-level-format a non-IBM-disk,
you have to patch llformat.com with debug as described below.

LLFORMAT.COM doesn't format a non-IBM-hard disk, because there is a
defect-map (info about defect blocks) on the cylinder before the last on
IBM-disks. But llformat.com only calls a BIOS-routine via INT 13h, where
one can set a flag to ignore the defect-map (set bits 0,1 in CL-register)

Here is the reference for the BIOS-low-level-formatting-routine:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>> No idea what this means, but it's impressive as heck... read on......

ESDI-Formatter:
===============
INT 13h, function 1Ah
register-settings:

AH=1Ah ; format ESDI
AL=number of additional given defect-blocks; when AL=0 the address in ES:BX
is ignored
ES:BX=address of the table with the additional defect-blocks
CL=some options:
bits 7-5: must be 0
bit 4: when set an interrupt (int 15h with AH=0Fh, AL=some status)
is triggered after formatting one cylinder
The interrupt-handler must clear the carry-flag CF, otherwise
(or when an interrupt isn't handled) formatting is aborted
bit 3: when set the hard disk's surface is analyzed in detail;
may be set only when the disk was formatted successfully with
bit 3=0 before
bit 2: a second defect map is written to disk, when this bit is 1;
this defect-map contains the already known defects plus the ones
given at address ES:BX and that found during detailed
analysis (bit 3=1)
bit 1: when this bit is set, the second defect-map is ignored
bit 0: when this bit is set, the first defect-map is also ignored
(this is normally written by the manufacturer)
DL=number of hd; 80h for the first drive, 81h for the second
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
To ignore the defect-maps, you have to patch llformat.com as follows:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>> Here comes the good part.....

PATCH FOR LLFORMAT.COM:
=======================

>debug llformat.com
-r
AX=0000 BX=0000 CX=8195 DX=0000 SP=FFFE BP=0000 SI=0000 DI=0000
DS=2B78 ES=2B78 SS=2B78 CS=2B78 IP=0100 NV UP EI PL NZ NA PO NC
2B78:0100 E9C50D JMP 0EC8

>>>>> See that CX= number? I am a complete newbie at DEBUG,
but it has something to do with file length and position on
the floppy. Write yours down....

-s100 8295 b4 1a b0 00 8a ; search formatting-routine

>>>>> See how it appears, again, incremented a bit (8195 =>
>>>>> 8295)? do this to your number in its place. Use HEX! so an E
>>>>> =>F etc....
>>>>> Lord! I am debug clueless eh!

2B78:8272 ; the byte sequence is found twice
2B78:8284

>>>>> You, of course got different numbers... write em down...

-u8272
; ^^^^ this is the first of the two found addresses

>>>>>> do this with your first number, the second part, of
>>>>>> course... Your XXXX:XXXX numbers will be different, but
>>>>>> the rest will make sense, note that the screen will line up
>>>>>> the numbers in nice columns, not exactly as shown below...

; now debug shows this:
2B78:8272 B41A MOV AH,1A ; select "FORMAT"-function
2B78:8274 B000 MOV AL,00 ; no additional defect map
2B78:8276 8A160473 MOV DL,[7304]
2B78:827A b114 MOV CL,14 ; <--- change 14 to 15!
2B78:827C 0A0E7377 OR CL,[7773]
2B78:8280 CD13 INT 13 ; BIOS-call
2B78:8282 7210 JB 8294 ; error -> return
2B78:8284 B41A MOV AH,1A
2B78:8286 B000 MOV AL,00
2B78:8288 8A160473 MOV DL,[7304]
2B78:828C B11C MOV CL,1C ; <--- change 1c to 1d!
2B78:828E 0A0E7377 OR CL,[7773]
-u

>>>>>> Don't get antsy! just look, the -u means show next
>>>>>> page... NOW: see the lines to be changed above?
>>>>>> WRITE DOWN THEIR ADDRESS NUMBERS!!!

2B78:8292 CD13 INT 13
2B78:8294 C3 RET
2B78:8295 0000 ADD [BX+SI],AL
; and so on...

>>>>>> Now the scary part: -e for edit... unless you -w
>>>>>> something you can always -q then try again...

-e827B ; <---- insert address of the first byte that must be changed
2B78:827B 14.15

>>>>>> USE your first change address number. The screen is
>>>>>> different from above. tap the space bar to get 14. then put 15
>>>>>> right after it. use the -u command to list it. did it change
>>>>>> correctly? Note the number right after the address changed
>>>>>> too, as well as the endmost... Actually, everything past the
>>>>>> first column is interpretation of it, but if it changed right,
>>>>>> you got it... If it didn't, -q and try again...

-e828D ; <---- insert address of the second byte that must be changed
2B78:828D 1C.1D

>>>>>> One more time! Use -u to check both, then:

-w ; save the patched program
Writing 08195 bytes

>>>>> Your mileage may vary...

-q ; that's it
I hope this will help you!

Martin.
(schmidm@informatik.tu-muenchen.de)
------------------------- END QUOTE ----------------------
>>>>>> The above person posted the XLATION, and might have
developed this. I found it with DEJANEWS, thanks to a tip from
Aron Eisenpress, who has been invaluable with his help and
suggestions, etc...
Of course, I floundered through DEBUG (1st time) but it seemed
to go ok...

2) Install ESDI drive. Drive was previously set up to work
with an ISA card, a DTC, I think... Cabling is similar to an
MFM drive, drive 0 gets the middle, no twist wide cable plug, and
the skinny cable from the middle connector. Plug in the IBM
card in the top-most slot, (cables are SHORT), hook up power
and ground, cables to drive, insert REF disk, turn on....

Run auto-configuration, restart, computer sez to test the
drive...DON'T BOTHER.

3) Press CTRL-A instead, choose format the drive, DO IT.
3A) You get an error message, it wants to do a FACTORY REFORMAT,
LET IT, it will take a while: 45 min for a CDC 94216-106,
(1024x5x34spt) 86M. When finished, reboot with a dos disk,
run FDISK and FORMAT C:/U/S. Run a few surface tests using
NDD or PCTOOLS, or whatever if you feel like it.
OH yeh: I'm using dos 5....

4) CROW! Yehawwww!

Now, to try and get a second ESDI drive set up as D:
Hope this can help some others, Just trying to get the info
out where it can keep the old beasts going...


Q) 3.9 Do I need a reference disk for my SCSI drive?

No, only for the controller. This question has come up a lot lately. If you
are having problems getting a new drive to work with a existing working SCSI
setup, call the drive manufacturer and try not to tell them it is a PS/2.
Also refer to some of the earlier SCSI questions about problems that arise
(switching drives around works many times). Most tech support people have
heard rumors that PS/2's need reference disks for everything and that they are
incompatible with everything. So they either tell you to get the reference
disk (usually from IBM as if they support third parties ever) or that their
drive is not compatible with PS/2 computers. I would also call the SCSI
adapter manufacturer (assuming they are still around and supporting it) for
clues. Remember setting up SCSI drives can have a lot of variables, keep
checking for proper ID, proper termination, and the like.

When shopping for a SCSI controller card, I would recommend either the Adaptec
1640 or the Future Domain MCS-700 (or the MCS-600 which is the same except
uses an Apple type DB-25 external SCSI connector instead of the standard 50
pin. Both use the 50 pin connector for the internal drives).


Q) 3.10 What is a 16550UART and do I need one? Does my PS/2 have it?

The 16550 is a UART with two 16 byte FIFOs. A UART is the part of a serial
port that takes byte-wide (characters) data and converts it to bit-wide
(serial) data, and visa versa. The FIFO is a buffer which can hold characters
until the CPU is ready to remove it or until the serial line is ready to
transmit it. The 'normal' UART in the PC (the 8250 or 16450) only has 1-byte
FIFOs. The additional 15 bytes can be useful when the CPU is busy doing other
things - if the CPU isn't able to remove data fast enough, it will be lost.
The OS or program has to explicitly support 16550 to make full use of its
advantages.

A very important thing to note is that under DOS, the CPU doesn't have
anything else to do, so the 16550 is wasted. Only under multitasking
operating systems does it really become useful. The 16550 will *not* make
your file transfers any faster, it will only prevent data from being lost and
relieve your CPU of some overhead. If you notice system performance dropping
like a rock when file transfers are occurring, a 16550 may be helpful. If
you see re-transmissions (bad packets) or "FIFO overrun's" during file
transfers under a multitasking OS, try the same thing under DOS - if the
errors go away, then chances are a 16550 will be useful. If they remain, then
your problem is likely to be elsewhere.

PS/2s without the more modern 16550A UART are usually limited to lower data
rates (not because of the 16550 UART but because the other UARTs are slow).
Usually 14.4k max with no compression. The PS/2 models and type of UART are
listed below.

From: Aron Eisenpress :
The following information is taken directly from the PS/2 Hardware
Interface Technical References.

Four types of serial port controllers have been used on the system
boards of PS/2's.

To programs, the Type 1 controller appears to be identical to the serial port
on the IBM Personal Computer AT IBM Personal Computer Serial/Parallel
Adapter.

The Type 2 controller incorporates all functions of the Type 1 and also
provides support of the first-in-first-out (FIFO) mode.

The Type 3 controller incorporates all functions of the Type 2 controller and
provides the Direct Memory Access (DMA) mode.

The Type 4 controller incorporates all the functions of the Type 3 controller
and provides additional I/O addresses.

For type 1 and type 2 controllers data speed should not exceed 19.2kbaud.
Type 3 and type 4 controllers support up to 345.6 Kbaud.

Below is a list of the type of serial controller used in each model in the
Micro Channel PS/2 line: (Note, these are IBM's published times. I have been
advised by
Mark Seecof that any PS/2 with the 16550A (including the
16550AF) is
capable of over 19.2 Kbaud as long as the software supports it).

Model Type of Serial Port Max Speed
----- ------------------- -----------
8550 1,2 19.2 Kbaud
8551 (N51) 2 19.2 Kbaud
8554 (CL57) 2 19.2 Kbaud
8555 2 19.2 Kbaud
8556 4 345.6 Kbaud
8557 4 345.6 Kbaud
8560 1,2 19.2 Kbaud
8565 2 19.2 Kbaud
8570 2 19.2 Kbaud
8573 (P70) 2 19.2 Kbaud
8580 1,2 19.2 Kbaud
8590 3 345.6 Kbaud
8595 3 345.6 Kbaud

IBM uses a proprietary chip instead of the 16550 UART in PS/2's. The serial
port controller in all of the above PS/2 models (except the PS/2 models 55
and 65) is compatible with the National Semiconductor NS16450 serial port.
The serial port controller in the PS/2 models 55 and 65 is generally
compatible with the NS16550A serial-communications controller.

PS/2's with Type 2, Type 3, or Type 4 serial port controllers support the
first-in-first-out (FIFO) mode. The exception is the PS/2 model 50 with a
Type 2 serial port controller. According to the PS/2 Hardware Interface
Technical Reference - System Specific Information, model 60's and 80's with
Type 2 serial port controllers do support FIFO mode.

[incomplete please help me obtain the UART data on the other PS/2s. A good
program is Snooper v3.30 by Vias and Associates for $39 available as shareware
on most BBSs and internet ftp sites, please register if you decide to keep it]


Q) 3.11 Should I buy an internal or external modem?

In general, it is better to go with an external modem for two reasons. First
MCA slots are valuable commodities in most systems (i.e. Model 50s with only 3
slots) and secondly, an MCA card modem will be a lot more money when a
standard external modem will work fine. Also an external modem provides
visual clues to tell you what is going on with the data.

Sometimes internal is the only way to go though. The Windsurfer Adapter
with its 14.4k data modem, 9600 FAX and telephone answering/voice mail is
only available internally, however, this is not such a waste of a MCA slot
as you are getting several products on one card. I believe in its last
incarnation (it has been discountinued) some versions were 33.6k capable which
is still ok for many.


Q) 3.12 What kinds of sound cards are available?

There are a few believe it or not. Though new they cost around $150 which is
a little steep these days for a sound card with SoundBlasters selling for $30.
Kahlon computers at www.kahlon.com and 800-317-9989 offers one for $125
(though I am not sure who actually makes it). The original was the
SoundBlaster MCV which is an 8 bit card and probably should be avoided due to
the problems it has with compatibility. The SoundBlaster Pro MCV is a 8 bit
card which supposedly works better, yet both SoundBlasters are no longer made.
The next option is the Audiovation/A ($249) which is a 16 bit card capable of
44.1KHz sampling rates is SoundBlaster compatible and is currently being
revised for better support. Another option is the M-Audio Capture/A which is
said to be more of a sound editor than one for games. Another option is the
WindSurfer Card. This is probably overkill as solely a soundcard for its $400
low price, but it does offer a 14.4k modem (some up to 33.6k), 9600 FAX and
telephone answering/voice mail on one card. This card is probably not as
compatible as the Audiovation is, but maybe worth a test to see if it does
what you would like. The Chipchat is currently available in both 16 bit
($129) and 32 bit ($159 with wavetable)go to www.chipchat.com or call them at
(313)565-4000. Reply Technologies has a card out using the chipset from
Creative Labs, the Vibra 16, which is SoundBlaster 16 compatible and it is
also available linked up to a Future Domain SCSI-2 controller. One more
option comes from Piper Research at www.piper-research.com and 612-459-2770,
this is a SoundBlaster compatible card. They used to only make a 16 bit card
($129.95), but now they have a 32 bit version ($159.95) and a 32 bit with 3D
sound ($179.95).

Here is the specs to the Piper Card:
(From: ejfluhr@wc101.residence.gatech.edu (Eric J. Fluhr) and
corykim@vnet.ibm.com (Cory Kim))

Piper Research, Inc.
Attn: Sales
PO Box 241
Newport, MN 55055
Voice/Orders: (612) 459-2770 (Mastercard/Visa/AmEx)
Fax: (612) 458-1978


16 bit stereo sound card. Records, compresses and plays back voice,
sound and music with computer controlled mixer settings and Yamaha OPL-3
based FM synthesis. In addition, connections are provided for CD-audio,
line-in, dual joystick, MIDI and speakers. Other key features include:

o Micro Channel Architecture compatible o 4 Watt Stereo Amplifier
o Half-Size Adapter o Compatible with all Major
o Auto-configures like all MC cards Software Programs
o Multimedia PC Compatible o Stereo Mixer & Amplifier
o Integrated 16 bit A/D and D/A Converters o Patented ESPCM Compression
o Programmable Digital Volume Control o Windows compatible and
o Programmable Sample Rates to 44.1 kHz OLE Compliant inc. Win95
o DOS-register compatible with SoundBlaster o Several bundled Applets
and drivers

32 bit stereo sound card. Records, compresses and plays back voice,
sound and music with computer controlled mixer settings and Yamaha OPL-3
based FM synthesis. In addition, connections are provided for CD-audio,
line-in, dual joystick, MIDI and speakers. Other key features include:

o Micro Channel Architecture compatible o 4 Watt Stereo Amplifier
o Half-Size Adapter o Compatible with all Major
o Auto-configures like all MC cards Software Programs
o Multimedia PC Compatible o Stereo Mixer & Amplifier
o Integrated 16 bit A/D and D/A Converters o Patented ESPCM Compression
o Programmable Digital Volume Control o Windows compatible and
o Programmable Sample Rates to 44.1 kHz OLE Compliant inc. Win95
o DOS-register compatible with SoundBlaster o Several bundled Applets
o Daugthercard connector for 3D sound option and drivers
(however this is useless as it must be
purchased with the card).

3D Sound for SoundPiper 32. Adds Spatializer(TM) two speaker surround effect
with three levels, independent bass and treble, MUST BE ORDERED WITH
SoundPiper 32 as it cannot be bought separately.

The SoundBlaster and Piper Cards are industry standards and thus offer the
most compatibility in most games Piper uses the SoundBlaster Pro Chip from
ESS. Most these cards may cause problems in the Windows environment as they
were developed before Windows was around, however for DOS games the
SoundBlaster Pro is THE card to have. The Audiovation/A and the others only
emulate a SoundBlaster using Mwave technology which is THE thing for WINDOWS.
So depending on what you do most choose a card, also two cards can be used if
the reference disk is patched.

From thedean@ibm.net:
There has been much discussion regarding PS/2 Micro Channel - MCA - sound
cards. Here is a quick comparison. This comparison addresses both hardware
and driver capabilities. It is important to consider both, since if there is
no driver to support a hardware capability then the capability is not useable.

A perfect example is OS/2 drivers. Although each sound card in this
comparison has "16 bit" record/playback hardware, some cards use the
"SoundBlaster Pro MCV" driver shipped with OS/2 Warp. This driver only
supports "8 bit", not allowing "16 bit" files to be recorded or played.

MicroChannel
CARD -> ChipChat-16 ChipChat-32 Piper-16/32 Reply

HARDWARE:
16 bit rec/play YES YES YES YES
MPU-401 MIDI YES YES NO YES
WaveTable upgrade YES NO upgrade
FM YES YES YES YES
Stereo Mixer 6 Channel 6 Channel 5 Channel 5 Channel

SoundBlaster YES YES YES YES
CD audio connectors YES,4 YES,4 YES,1 YES,1
IBM Front Panel conn. YES YES YES NO

SOFTWARE DRIVERS:
16 bit rec/play
WIN 3.1 YES YES YES YES
WIN 95 YES YES YES NO
WIN NT YES YES YES ?
OS/2 YES YES YES NO
WIN-OS/2 YES YES YES ?
AIX YES YES NO NO
WaveTable support
DOS upgrade YES NO upgrade
WIN 3.1 upgrade YES NO upgrade
WIN 95 upgrade YES NO NO
WIN NT upgrade YES NO ?
OS/2 upgrade YES NO NO
AIX upgrade YES NO NO
General Midi upgrade YES NO YES
Roland MPU-401
DOS YES YES NO YES
WIN 3.1 YES YES NO YES
WIN 95 YES YES NO NO
WIN NT YES YES NO ?
OS/2 YES YES NO NO
AIX YES YES NO NO

SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY:
DOS GAMES - Out of the box play no problem
DOOM YES YES Problems Problems
HERETIC YES YES NO ?
DESCENT YES YES NO ?
Game with WaveTable YES YES NO sometimes

AGENCY APPROVALS - YES means can sell and ship to those countries
World Wide Approvals YES YES NO NO
CE-MARK (Europe,UK..) YES YES NO NO
FCC-B (USA) YES YES YES YES
CSA (Canadian) YES YES ? ?
VCCI (JAPAN) YES YES NO NO

Also see Appendix F for a full listing of PS/2 Sound Cards.


Q) 3.13 Can I run both a SoundBlaster and the Audiovation/A?

[Jacques@cpmc.ucl.ac.be (Alain Jacques)]
Yes, it works ... after patching the ADF file. What's conflicting is the
addresses of the game port, defined in both ADF's as fixed resources and
therefore the conflict cannot be managed by the POS itself. If you choose to
keep the game port on the SBPro, just as I did, your Audiovation ADF file
@8FD6.ADF should look like the end of this message.

If you have difficulties, don't hesitate to email to me. BTW, there are new
Audiovation Windows drivers on IBM PC Co BBS (i.e. version 2.1 = av211.dsk,
av212.dsk, av213.dsk, av21util.dsk).

See Appendix C for Program listing.


Q) 3.14 Can I fake a keyboard so my computer will boot without it?

Well unlike the standard IBMs and clones, PS/2s perform a keyboard test at
boot. Some have the option of canceling the keyboard test through a setting
in the reference disk. If you do not have this option you must leave the
keyboard attached (or if you have the engineering experience doctor up a
small board that sends the proper reponses to the test back and can plug
into the keyboard port :)).

Or use this device below reported by Louis Ohland

http://www.raritan.com/newsite/guardian.htm.

Picture is at http://www.raritan.com/newsite/images/pgrdian.gif.

Blurb:
Each Guardian for PC, Mac, and Sun computers plugs into the keyboard port
and mouse port, and appears to the computer as its physical keyboard and
mouse. Since Guardian behaves like a keyboard and mouse, the computer will
boot and run flawlessly.

Guardian is powered by the computer and provides ports so you can "hot"
connect a keyboard and mouse anytime to operate the system. Using Guardian
with PCs connected to a mechanical A/B switch will eliminate PC booting
and keyboard locking problems.

With Guardian in line, you can hot connect or disconnect MasterConsole
cable or a physical keyboard and mouse. For mission-critical servers
connected to Raritan's MasterConsole, Guardian provides a "fail-safe"
service port.

Guardian for Mac and Guardian for Sun also convert the keyboard, mouse, and
video signals to PS/2 and VGA standards. This enables any number of Mac or
Sun computers equipped with Guardian, as well as PCs, to be connected to
MasterConsole and controlled with a single PS/2 keyboard, PS/2 mouse, and
VGA monitor.

Guardian for PS/2 -- APKME


S) 4.0 Upgrading Processor/Coprocessor/Disks/Video/CDROM

Q) 4.1 I don't have the money for a new computer or motherboard, what can I
do?

[PC Magazine 11-08-94, alkemyst@shadow.net)

Kingston Technology makes upgrades to raise the level of all chips (i.e. 286
to 386, 386 to 486, 486 to 586). Some are CPU replacements, others are
daughterboard cards, and the granddaddy is the MCMaster. The CPU replacements
offer very little performance gain if your system is strapped with slow
peripherals and memory, but can get you running 386 or 486 software. The
daughterboard 486/NOW! replaces both the CPU and math coprocessor, but
performance-wise it is a disappointment. The MCMaster is MCA architecture in
action. Using busmastering it allows the card to take over CPU functions and
make the computer run a lot faster using its own 128k L2 cache and up to 32MB
of memory. This card shows promise and in most cases performs better than the
daughterboards and CPU plug-ins, however it lags slightly in DOS video
performance and video in general as it must 'cross' the bus on to the
motherboard. Still the MCMaster is probably the fastest in this list and the
only upgrade that can add L2 cache to computers without the option. [Formats:
486/NOW!: models 70/80 to 33PD3 or 33PS3 (don't know what
the PD3 or PS3 maybe D=DX and S=SX.); MCMaster: for models 55, 56, 57, 65,
70, and 80: to 33MHz or 50MHz...note only 50MHz with 8MB+ boosted performance
and so it did significantly. The price for this level is $1000-1400.][NDP:
built in to the 486 chip.]

Intel has a SnapIn 386 module for PS/2 models 50, 50Z and 60. It features a
20MHz 80386SX, 16K cache and it can utilize an existing 80287 math
coprocessor. I have one in a model 60 and have had no problems with it.

IBM offers for the 386 PS/2 Model 70 and 80 with 16 or 20MHz processors a
Power Platform upgrade with a 486DX33 on it. See above IBM PARTS LIST for
features and part numbers. These are expensive ($500-700) and are no longer
made, but can still be obtained esp. from the Boulder Parts Surplus Plant
800-388-7080.

IBM re-released the Blue Lightning chip for PS/2's again. This time it is for
the 25MHz machines also. It offers 16K internal cache, enhanced 386/486
instruction set, and 33/66MHz performance (though the 33 will be replaced with
whatever your system runs at). Also you can add a math coprocessor. The L1
cache design is supposed to be what sets this chip off
from the rest (Hypertec). I talked to a IBM tech who actually had the Cyrix
DRx2-50 and was asked to help test out this new chip. He stated he saw the
same performance jump from going to a Cx486DRx2-50 from his 386DX25 as going
to the BL2 from the Cyrix. I would call that an upgrade worth considering,
esp. at the mere $345 IBM is asking. IBMPN#13H6698 $345.

IBM also has a SLC2-66 chip out for 55SX offering up to 10x the
performance. Features 16K L1 cache, enhanced instruction set, and allows
existing 387SX usage providing it is a 33MHz chip. IBMPN#13H6694 $259.

Cyrix offers very good options for the 386 to 486 conversion if you are on
a tight budget. Their DRx2 line offers clock doubled performance at a low
price. The chips perform very well and just require removal of the 386 and
popping in the new chip. Pricewise they can't be beat and though not offering
the performance of their $500+ cousins they come close enough for most people
at half the cost or more (This is due to their tiny 1k L.1 caches). [Formats:
386 to 486 only: DX16MHz to 16/32MHZ, DX20MHz to 20/40MHz, 25MHz to
25/50MHz, DX33MHz to 33/66MHz, none for 40MHz yet. DX16MHz and 20MHz systems
can use the 25MHz chip if available. Some versions for SX models.][NDP: 387,
Cyrix 83D87 rec.]

Evergreen's Rev to DX4 and 486 chips are more expensive and generally faster
than most others at a lower prices. One problem is compatibility, many
computers can not run at the clock tripled and quadrupled rates and must
fall back to clock doubled rate negating the extra cost of the upgrade.
Another note is the processor board cards will not work with all systems due
to space constraints, it is best to measure and make sure you got at least 1"
or more room above the processor and can afford to give up peripheral card
space if it is in the way. A processor card may be worth it if it works due
to the fact of a larger L1 cache and the usage of an IBM Blue Lightning CPU
in some formats. [Formats: 386 to 486: DX16/DX20MHz to TI 486SXL2 or Blue
Lightning 16/48 or 20/60, DX25MHz to TI 486SXL2 or Blue Lightning 25/75,
DX33MHz to Blue Lightning 33/66 or 33/99; 486 to 486: SX/DX25MHz to 25/75MHz,
SX/DX33MHz to 33/99MHz, SX/DX50MHz to 50/100MHz. Note the DX4 only clock
triples or doubles not quadruples like a DX4 seems it should.][NDP: various.]

H.Co is offering many chips now from 286 to 486 all the way to a 386 to
DX4/100. I am interested to see how these perform as I have no info other
than formats available. [Formats: 286 to 486: 6-16MHz to IBM50MHz; 386
to 486: SX/DX16/20MHz to TI40MHz, DX25MHz to TI50MHz, DX25MHz to IBM50MHz,
SX/DX33MHz to IBM66MHz, SX16MHz to IBM48MHz, SX20MHz to IBM60MHz, DX16/20MHz
to IBM 60MHz, DX25MHz to IBM75MHz, DX33 to IBM99MHz; 486 to 486: 25MHz to
75MHz, 33MHz to 100MHz, 40MHz to 100MHz.][NDP: ?]

A small company called MicroModules System also offers CPU upgrades. They
are at 10500-A Ridgeview Court, Cupertino, CA 95014-0736. 408-864-7437.
Then there are AOX Inc.'s MicroMASTER busmaster boards. From 386-20 to
486/33 with up to 8MB of RAM on board. This is what the Kingston is now.
Kingston bought the rights to manufacture the MicroMaster. The early 286
to 386 versions can utilize 132PGA chips and usually 486DLC and DRx2 chips
will work, but these are no longer made and must be found used or in surplus
warehouses. [Formats: 286 to 386: to 20MHz, 25MHz, 33Mhz][NDP: 387.]

In summary the MCMaster fully configured, i.e. 486/50 with 8 to 16MB of RAM
offered the best performance, followed closely by Evergreen's DX4, Cyrix and
finally Kingston. H.Co, IBM, Intel, and AOX were not tested.

Also note that adding 8MB of RAM will usually add as much performance as the
CPU upgrades do and add a lot more performance if combined with the CPU
upgrade. The addition of RAM, a Video card, faster hard drive, and a new CPU
will make the most improvement and if done over a period of time makes sense,
however if these are going to be bought 'lump sum' it is probably better to
buy a 486 clone if you are looking for speed. If reliability is a big factor
and speed not as important as being able to run the new 386+ software then
with PS/2's usually there are no problems as there are with most clones.

Update as of 10/28/98, there are no processor cards (AOX MicroMaster or
MCMaster) available for the PS/2's anymore. Evergreen and Kingston are still
selling their processor upgrades and prices have fallen dramatically. For the
486/33 systems you can get the AMD 586/133 (equivalent to a Pentium 75) for
about $70 from CompUSA, Fry's, or Circuit City (list is about $129 for
Evergreen's and $99 for Kingston).


Q) 4.2 What are the Benchmarks for these Processor Upgrades?

Benchmarks are meaningless to give as it would not be the same machine nor
the same variables but below are some 'averages'. Benchmarks are only good
to compare the same settings to the same settings so if you have a machine
listed and have different marks don't post to USENET asking why, as it is
simply because you have a different configuration. The basic outline
discussed above gives you the breakdown in percent a CPU upgrade is worth
36-134%, a daugtherboard is worth 137-681%(681% percent seems high and was
not supported by PC Magazine's data. The 137% seems more real world as these
are very close to direct CPU replacements for the most part), and an MCA
processor card 263% which offered the largest increase, but at a very high
cost.

Also note that a 486 is just an enhanced 386 with L1 cache. This L1 cache
is responsible for up to a 500% performance increase. L2 caches can offer at
most a 50% performance increase. Try disabling all caching on a 33MHz 486 and
compare the marks to a 33MHz 386 you will be surprised how close they are.

Winstones are the most quoted benchmark today, so a table of average Winstones
was computed. Keep in mind that this benchmark is a benchmark which rates the
execution of certain popular sequences, scripts, in about ten or so of the
most popular window programs. With this in mind this should give a *very*
real world figure. Also keep in mind that when the processor upgrades were
done, the systems below remained stock which is very crippling especially with
a 486 trying to pull files from a 20ms access hard drive.

The processor quoted benchmarks came from a database of at least 50 different
platforms each for the 25, 33, 2/50, 2/66 with the 33 and 66 MHz numbers being
taken as an average of no less than 50 machines for each. This should give a
good average number as there was no price range or brand criteria only what
was available to the home user (i.e. no FCC class A or non-FCC tested
dynamos).

The 50MHz numbers were for 5 tested machines. The AM40, CxS40, and SLC2
numbers are for two or less machines each and may be bad examples of the
capability of the chips being either superior or inferior to average numbers.
The Pentium numbers came from an average by PC Magazine and should be a good
average figure.

Processor Winstone Value
--------------------------------------------------
386/25MHz Winstone base w/4MB 10.20
386/25MHz Winstone base w/8MB 13.60
486/25MHz 26.32
CxS40 29.95*
486/33MHz 34.32
SLC2/50 36.70*
SLC2/66 37.80*
AMD40 40.30*
486DX2/50MHz 43.50
486/50MHz 47.94
486DX2/66MHz 50.68
Pentium 73.30
CX486DRx2/50 14.20 --
Rev to 486 2/50 15.40 \
Rev to 486 3/75 18.00 Keep in mind these could vary a lot
486/Now! 11.20 / depending what system the upgrade
MCMaster 50PD/8 15.00 -- is going into (i.e. MCMaster was
only tested on a 386SX16 machine
and the rest a Compaq 386DX/25e
with only 4MB and with 8MB the
Rev to 486 2/50 did 23 Winstones
and the 486/33 did 36. So with
more memory and better peripherals
the upgrades should give truer 486
performance despite PC Magazines
slams against them in general.


Q) 4.3 Which Math Co-Processor should I use?

For 286 systems a 287, 386 systems a 387 and for processor upgrades usually
the same unless they perform NDP functions on chip. It may be wise to
purchase an enhanced NDP, such as the 83D87 from Cyrix which is much faster
(5-15% in applications, up to 20% on certain benchmarks) than the Intel part.


Q) 4.4 How can get rid of my slow stock Hard Drive and get a faster and
larger capacity version?

PS/2's are notorious for slow, low capacity hard drives. The Model 50's
20MB drive has 80ms access! The easiest way to go is to add a SCSI or ESDI
card. SCSI in general offers better performance, the ability to add up to 7
peripherals and easy to find drives. ESDI offers more UNIX compatibility
(though with new drivers this will change) and was stock on some PS/2's,
most now use SCSI. If you have SCSI or ESDI already you can add at least one
more drive no problem. It is a bad idea in general to try and replace the
MFM type ST-506 drives on early PS/2s as buying a SCSI card and new hard drive
is a cheaper, faster and more reliable solution.

Keep in mind that if you add a SCSI drive and controller make sure the
controller has boot ability in the BIOS or else you will have to boot off of
the original PS/2 drive.


Q) 4.5 How can I add a second floppy drive and what type will work with my
PS/2?

Kits for mounting these drives can be obtained from PS Solutions 214-783-6997.
They sell high quality, complete kits for almost every possible internal drive
mounting option.

3.5" internal for:
25/30, 50Z/70, 50(front bay 50Z/70)
60/65/80 (via a 5.25" internal mount and allow for two half-high
3.5"/5.25" mounts)

3.5" 'H'-skid type for:
35/40/56/57/76/77(via the 5.25" int. option)

5.25" internal for:
35/40/56/57/76/77(all with 3.5" mount options available)
60/65/80 (vertical mount, also with dual half-high 3.5"/5.25"
options)
90 (for removable media in the 5.25" bay w/ 3.5"HD opt.)
85/95 (for removable media and rails for fixed media)

For systems with 'slide-it-right-in' options the necessary bezels can be
obtained from DakTech 800-325-3238 very cheaply for a high quality product.
(Also for bezels with missing clear plastic 'windows' which make it hard to
see the drive lights.)

First, we will discuss the 3.5" addition as it is a more common event.

The first thing you need to do is to determine the MB capacity of what you
want to add. There is 720K/1.44MB/2.88MB and they can all read/write at their
level or lower (i.e. a 2.88MB can read/write 1.44MB and 720K). Not all
systems can use all 3.5" drives. [I would like to include a list of which
systems CAN'T use the 1.44MB drives and which systems CAN use the 2.88MB
drive]. After determining what you need/want to add you can start the
installation.

*ADDING A 720K DRIVE:

*INTERNAL OPTION:
*EXTERNAL OPTION:


ADDING A 1.44MB DRIVE:

INTERNAL OPTION:
There are two types of 1.44MB drives and though they do the same thing they
are not interchangeable on the internal level. One has the disk light above
the media slot and the other has it below the media slot (there are other ways
to tell but this is the easiest method). Once you determine this it is simply
a matter of either popping off the faceplate bezel blank sliding in the disk
drive until it 'clicks' and popping on the new bezel. Sometimes the external
case needs to be opened like a model 50 for example, but then the procedure is
the same.

*EXTERNAL OPTION:


*ADDING A 2.88MB DRIVE:

*INTERNAL OPTIONS:
*EXTERNAL OPTIONS:

Now we will discuss the addition of a 1.2MB 5.25" drive.

These can be both adding internally or externally. External is the common way
as most PS/2s do not provide a 5.25" floppy bay and those that do usually
require a vertical mounting arrangement.

*The models supporting a direct 5.25" mount internally are:

All other's need to either buy the kits listed above or need to use an
external mounting option.

*INTERNAL MOUNTING:
*The internal 5.25" drive is installed by sliding it into the bay
[someone please contact me with the directions for the direct installs
..do they click into place like the 3.5" drives or do they require
screws/or combination.]

The kit-type installations are completed by following the manufacturers
guidelines for the kit then going to the drive hookup section below.

*Hooking up the drive to the drive card:

EXTERNAL MOUNTING:

Find a place on you desk or area where the likelihood of the drive being
knocked down is low. Then set the drive down and detach the cable if possible
from the drive to prevent it being dragged around in the installation
procedures.

Now you are ready to set it up:

IBM:
Open the case of the computer, find an empty MCA slot. Plug in the floppy
controller card and run the cable to it. Now close up the computer and plug
in the 5.25" external drive and you should be all set.

Cristie drive (available only in the UK?):
The drive connects to the B-3.5" floppy connector. The cable then goes inside
the computer, through the slot in the back and finally to the drive.
It doesn't actually use a slot, but looks neater than having a cable run out
the front B: drive bay to the 5.25" drive.

Radio Shack/Tandy's 5.25":
This drive will give you 360 and 1.2mb formats via the parallel port, and
allows you to plug your printer in too -- so you lose neither a drive bay, an
expansion slot, or much money. The drive can be temperamental, usually
requiring a print job before the drive is acknowledged (maybe initialization
of the parallel port is what is required). The print job can be empty also.
This drive is an ideal solution which lets you keep your tape backup and
expansion cards in place, even if requiring an extra step to use the drive.

Sysgen unit:
Its not a very awkward installation. Just pop off the cover. Unplug the
floppy connector. Snap a small board in on supplied post, and re-install
the floppy connector and route the other out the box to the external unit.
It works as drive B in 1.2 meg mode. The IBM's I saw mapped above the last
hard drive, so that floppy came in as D or E. Works fine with SCO Xenix too.

[I have been informed that the IBM drives also require the usage of one of the
3.5" floppy bays for a second drive card, is this the case for all 5 1/4"
drives?]


Q) 4.6 Is there a SVGA option for my PS/2?

There's XGA and XGA/2 from IBM and the Reply Video Adapter from Reply
Technologies. Both of these have 1MB of unexpandable VRAM and can display 256
colors at 1024x768 non-interlaced and go to 1280x1024x16. The IBM card uses a
IBM chip and the Reply the Cirrus Logic CD-GL 5426 chipset which is VESA
compatible.

IBM also has a SVGA card for servers. As such, it maxes out at 256 colors.

A note about XGA/2, it is not VESA compatible at the hardware level...there
are drivers that allow it to be VESA compliant but these drivers freak out
many pieces of commercial software...be advised.

Also on the high end, I know of Matrox making some in the $1k + range that
have 1MB+ of VRAM but I have yet to hear of the performance or to run into
someone who has purchased one. Also RasterOps Colorboard 1024MC can display
1024x768x16.7M (no modes above 1024x768) with the 3MB of VRAM it has, but it
is slow compared to other video cards and expensive. Also I am curious as to
the specs of the IBM Image I Adapter which is about $2.7k with 3MB VRAM for
1280x1024x256 color support.

ATI has the Ultra Pro 2MB a 2MB VRAM card with a 32 bit accelerator. This
card had be found for as low as $250 (retails for ~$500)[prices as of 1996].
I am curious to its performance as the 64 bit versions are top in their class,
but for just the ability to get greater color depth the 2MB card is worth it.
Be advised that ATI has the habit of constantly changing its drivers so
compatibility issues may arise and a downtime for new drivers may be upon you.
It uses the Mach32 chipset so is widely supported, NT 4.0 supports this also.


Q) 4.7 How can I add a CD-ROM drive to my PS/2?

Most of the time an external CD-ROM can be added if you have a SCSI card with
no problem. Internal CD-ROMs can be added to any PS/2 with a 5 1/4" bay, some
that have internal 5 1/4" bays (60/65SX/80) can use special bezels to
vertically mount a CD-ROM. In these cases caddy-type drive are mandatory.
The drivers needed are usually dependant on which SCSI card you use so contact
the manufacturer if CD drivers were not supplied.


Q) 4.8 How can I build a Multimedia PS/2?

You can build a multimedia PS/2 the same way as a normal PC. The exceptions
are sound cards. As it stands now you must use the SB-pro or clone for DOS
and the Audiovation/A or equivalent for windows. Any SCSI CD-ROM should
work with a SCSI card and any big monitor will work. Reply Technologies,
Matrox, and ATI all make video cards for SVGA, some have up to 3MB of RAM.
Also any speaker setup will work with the soundcards providing they have
they same connectors (usu. RCA or mini RCA). Other than that you will
want a fast hard drive and probably a 33MHz or faster machine.

Here is an example:

PS/2 Model 80-A21
Cyrix Cx486DRx2-50 Processor upgrade with 33D87 NDP.
Mag DX15F Monitor
Reply Technology Video Adapter
Plextor 4x CD-ROM (internal mounted)
Piper or ChipChat SB-Pro sound card
Audiovation/A sound card
Seagate ST-3600N SCSI hard drive
Future Domain MCS-600 SCSI controller.
Sony Speakers
CH Game Card III
Generic PC joystick


Q) 4.9 How can I get sound effects in DOOM?

[From: cousinad@aol.com (Cousin AD)]

Option #1:
Choose all the WRONG settings for the DMA, IRQ and I/O address. Save
settings and play... You may still need to re-boot one time before this
works.

Option #2:
Choose the wrong setting for the I/O Address (use the correct settings for
the IRQ & DMA).

The above worked for me, but I found problems setting-up for modem play...
I figured, hey, you can't have it all... Then I got another suggestion
that really solved the problem...

Option #3:
Choose all the CORRECT settings for the DMA, IRQ and I/O Address. Exit
set-up and choose yes to "Save settings before exit." Then, before
starting DOOM, open the file DEFAULT.CFG in an ASCII text editor (MS-DOS
"EDIT" for instance). Change the "SND_SBPORT" line from 544 to 220 or
240, depending on your SoundBlaster MCV configuration. Save the
DEFAULT.CFG file and start DOOM...

Q) 4.10 How can I make my PS/2 Model 90/95 a Pentium 180/200MMX machine?

First it is going to always be a P180MMX as the clock tripling runs at 3x60
and
there is no easy way to modify this, although if a budding Electrical
Engineering
student wants to do so I am sure the list would love a P233MMX version. As
long
as the chip is above the rated speed you are OK, just like it made sense to
always buy the 33MHz 387 math coprocessor as you could use it in any 387 slot
and not have to repurchase a FPU when you upgraded CPU's.

Secondly, you must use the Overdrive version of the P180MMX or P200MMX as the
non-Overdrive version do not work properly in this capacity.

Also note the P90 version of the Type 4 complex is needed. Contrary to
popular
belief all of the Type 4 complexes are as different from each other as they
are
to the Type 1, 2, and 3 complexes (as well as each different kind of those).

You need the "Y" upgrade of the Type 4 complex, announced Oct 1994, and known
as
IBM Part Number/FRU# 06H3739 or 19H1027 (and a few other crossreferenced
numbers).
These go for about as much as a small third world country (or half the
continental
United States if purchased directly from IBM). So make sure you can afford to
lose
this board should any of the below modifications screw up your processor board
or
PC. If performed as outlined and no mistakes are made it is a totally
reliable
modification and brings your machine to the front of the pack. Remember most
applications peak out at 200-233MHz Pentium speeds and the PII's are really
only
useful for games, high-end graphics, and high-end multiuser server
applications.

The complete breakdown with pics is available at:
http://www.inwave.com/~ohlandl/P90upgrd.html

Disclaimer

Modifying your processor complex with these instructions will void your
warranty
and may cause irreparable damage resulting in a non-functioning processor
complex
if performed incorrectly. There are no warranties expressed or implied. Modify
at
your own risk. (Manufacturers warranty on newly purchased PC Server 500's was
usually three years depending on country of purchase. Check your warranty
information if concerned or unsure. Optional service contracts may have
altered
or extended your period.)


Introduction

The following instructions can assist you in modifying the 90Mhz Pentium
processor
complex that was originally manufactured in the IBM PC Server 500 System390 so
that you can use the PentiumŪ Overdrive 180Mhz with MMX chip. If you unplug
the
PentiumŪ 90Mhz chip from the complex and plug in the 180Mhz PentiumŪ Overdrive

without this modification, you will experience two problems:

I. The electric fan that cools the PentiumŪ Overdrive chip will not have power

to turn the blades. You will 'cook" (burn out) the PentiumŪ Overdrive due
to
inadequate cooling. (The 90Mhz PentiumŪ chip uses a heat sink instead of an

electric fan.)
2. Without providing 5 volts to the overdrive chip, the chip will run at about
25Mhz which is slower than the installed 90Mhz chip.

Directions

* Locate and have a working reference diskette for the PC Server 500
available.
You will need it if you use a different processor complex board than the one
currently installed. You should not need it if you remove, modify, and
replace
the same processor complex board that is currently installed. Better to
locate
and have it ready than to not have it.
* The processor complex does not use a ZIF (zero insertion force) socket for
the
PentiumŪ processor. The old 90Mhz processor must be carefully removed. (A
good
quality jewler's screwdriver was useful to the author in starting to pry the
chip from the socket and then working around the perimeter of the chip
increasing in small increments. Insert the tip of the screwdriver between
the
socket and the chip. Use only the socket surface and not other chips or
edges
on the board as fulcrums for prying.)
* Solder an insulated wire from the +5 volt regulator to the two unused pins
on
the PentiumŪ 'internally no-connect'.
* The two pins are technically labeled AN01 and AN03. There are no labels
visible
that say AN01 or AN03.
* After the wire has been soldered to all three points and allowed to cool,
carefully align all pins of the new processor to their respective holes
taking
note of the key (missing pin on one corner). Carefully push the new
processor
into the holes. The new processor pins may be longer than those of the old
processor and therefore there may be a gap between the bottom of the new
processor and the socket surface.
* Reinsert the processor complex into the PC Server and reconnect the signal
wire.
Power on the server and assure that the fan on the Pentium Overdrive
processor is
turning (a flashlight aimed at the fan when power is applied will probably
be
necessary).
* You will note that the LED display on the front of the PC Server 500 will
say
"60Mhz" instead of "90Mhz." This is normal.

Modify at your own risk! Modification will void warranty.


S) 5.0 Adding System and Cache Memory

Q) 5.1 How do I add memory to my PS/2 off the motherboard?

[Test from PC Magazine January 28, 1992]

There are several RAM cards out there for the PS/2 and you do not necessarily
need a 32 bit card to get the max performance as will be shown.
(all cards tested on a Model 70-A21).

KEY:

%READ = The read speed of memory using 4K blocks in sequence from 0MB to 16MB
in relation to motherboard memory writes.
%WRITE = The write speed of memory using 4K blocks in sequence from 1MB to
16MB blocks in relation to motherboard memory writes. (not less than
1MB due to that memory being of the resident OS)
TESTED = The as TESTED config, 8MB of 80ns RAM was used for each card.
MAX = The maximum memory able to be put on the RAM card in MB. Though MCA
computers don't allow DMA or direct memory access transfers past
16MB, certain OS's for non-DMA type usage i.e. disk caches and EMS.
SIMM = 9 bit (30 pin) or 36 bit (72 pin) SIMM requirements.
SOCKET = The amount of SIMM sockets on the RAM card.
256-16 = The size of SIMM it can take in K or MB.
INTEGR = The integration of the card to the system. BIOS is the right way
and allows all memory to be read at or during POST. T0 is Track 0
method which is not as per IBM spec. This uses a special driver from
the hard drive before the OS loads and thus is not usually cached
and is reflected below in slower speeds. BOTH of course means both
can be used (on the CuRAM if BIOS is used 16MB is max and if T0 is
used then 32MB is possible). T0 also has the problem of not being
tested by the system. Unless the card does this any memory errors
do not get mapped out.
POST = Whether or not the memory is shown on the screen at POST. All BIOS
type card 'POST' their memory, but some do not show it.
BKFILL = Whether the RAM card allows backfill of any deficiencies of the 640k
base system RAM, more useful in 1MB systems and can allow 0
wait access through the MCA channel and increase performance on
such systems by 50%.
PORTS = Either (P)arallel or (S)erial included or as an (o)ption. PS means
one parallel and one serial included, PPSo means there is an option
for 2 parallel and 1 serial port and so on. NONE means no ports are
provided or offered as an option.
MODELS = The supported models, A = Models 50-65SX, B = Models 70-80 and C =
Models 90-95. Note if BC is specified it means a 32 bit card. Cards
with only a B designation do not work with 50-65SX or for some
reason the Model 90-95 even though it was a 32 bit card.
____________________________________________________________
| | % | T | | | S | | | | | | | I | | B| |M
| % | W | E | | | O | | | | | | | N | | K| P |O
| R | R | S | | S | C | 2| | | | | | T | P| F| O |D
| E | I | T | M | I | K | 5| | | | | | E | O| I| R |E
| A | T | E | A | M | E | 6| 1| 2| 4| 8|16| G | S| L| T |L
| D | E | D | X | M | T | K| M| M| M| M| M| R | T| L| S |S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
AboveBoard MC |80 |71 | 4 | 32|9 | 8 | Y| Y| N| Y| N| N|BIOS| N| Y|PSo |AB
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
AMS Memory |66 |46 | 8 | 16|36 | 4 | N| Y| Y| Y| N| N|BIOS| Y| N|PSo |BC
32DI | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Capital OS/RAM |80 |71 | 8 | 8|9 | 8 | Y| Y| N| N| N| N|BIOS| N| N|NONE|ABC
32 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Capital OS/RAM |80 |71 | 8 |128|9 | 8 | N| Y| N| Y| N| Y|BIOS| N| Y|NONE|ABC
32+ | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
CuRAM MC32 |80 |50 | 8 | 32|36 | 4 | N| Y| Y| Y| Y| N|BOTH| Y| N|NONE|BC
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kingston |80 |71 | 8 | 16|36 | 4 | N| Y| Y| Y| N| N|BIOS| Y| N|NONE|BC
KTM 3011-4 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
MicroRAM |80 |71 | 8 | 32|36 | 4 | N| Y| Y| Y| Y| N|BIOS| Y| Y|NONE|ABC
SC | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
MicroRAM |80 |71 | 8 | 32|9 | 8 | Y| Y| N| Y| N| N|BIOS| Y| Y|PSSo|BC
386 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Parity+Plus |69 |50 | 8 | 8|9 | 8 | Y| Y| N| N| N| N| T0 | N| N|NONE|B
P32010 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
RAMQuest |80 |45 | 8 | 8|9 | 8 | Y| Y| N| N| N| N|BIOS| Y| Y|PS |AB
16/32 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
SIMMply-RAM |80 |71 | 8 | 32|36 | 4 | N| Y| Y| Y| Y| N|BIOS| Y| N|NONE|BC
for PS/2 32 bit| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The winner here was the MicroRAM SC (a 16 bit card). Both cheap and with many
memory options. The 386 version offers a parallel and dual serial option that
would be a wise purchase if you needed those but the 9 bit memory it uses
needs to be installed in banks of four and thus in general the SC is the
preferred solution offering 100% of the performance of its 32 bit brother in a
16 bit config. (note: I don't know if the 16 bit cards will work as well with
processor upgrades, but clearly they worked as well in the 386/25MHz system
and were recommended for the 486 90/95.)

Please note that the 16 bit cards scored just as well in most cases and are
less money. Any card the scored percents of 80/71 operated at 0 wait states.
The MicroRAM allows 1 wait state with 120ns and matched memory with 100ns,
it will operate at 0 wait states with 85ns memory (this was not tested in
this test and is purely from the manufacturers mouth).

As of 1998, ChipChat (313)565-4000 (www.chipchat.com) now sells the MicroRam
SC cards. They have been changed a bit though I think as they no longer work
on the Model 90 or 95. They use four 36 bit 72 pin 80ns parity SIMMs in any
combination of 1, 2, 4 or 8MB chips, are compatible with models 55, 57, 70,
P70, P75, 77 and 80, but not the 90 or 95. They are 32 bit cards, but can
also be used in a 16 bit slot. They are also compatible with Win 95 and NT.


Q) 5.2 How do I add cache memory to my PS/2?

You can't unless it comes already on the board or you purchase a CPU upgrade
card with cache built in.

From Louis Ohland :

Type 1 complexes have a socket to add 256K L2 cache. www.bluestarusa.com has
2 available as of 1/7/99 for $85 each, I have no experience with this company.


Q) 5.3 Can I use 4MB modules if IBM only calls for 2MB?

Supposedly you can, but not per IBM. I had both a 80/20MHz and 80/25MHz here
recently with both 4MB and 2MB modules, but forgot to test this when I had
the chance. I don't want to say you definitely can until I or someone I trust
has done so. Until then by the memory at your own risk, it may very well
work, but give data dropout at times.


Q) 5.4 Who has memory the cheapest?

Really depends on what memory you are looking for. If it is SIMMs check
www.pricewatch.com, if it is for proprietary IBM memory you are better off
looking on comp.sys.ibm.ps2.hardware.


Q) 5.5 Is there a way to identify a PS/2 RAM card or SIMM?

[From Aron Eisenpress ]

If the SIMM slots are 3 on the left and 1 on the right then it is a 2-14. If
the slots are 2 and 2 then it is a 2-8mb adapter. There was a recall about 4
years ago on 2-14mb adapters that had data integrity problems with 4mb SIMMs,
but the problem was not ever produced outside the lab that was reported. If
it is 2-14 and has a sticker then it is probably one of the problem adapters.
However, the recall has expired and IBM is no longer providing replacements.


Q) 5.6 What is the ECC memory option on some of the newer PS/2s?

Normal parity memory allows for error-checking of single bit errors, but if a
multiple bit error is encountered it usually will crash or return corrupt
data. Either way there is no provision to correct the error. ECC (Error
Correction Code) memory error-checks for both single and multiple bit errors
and allows for correction of single bit errors.

Normal parity uses a single bit to protect 8 bits, ECC uses 7 bits to protect
64. Some motherboards/BIOS can allow the use of two normal parity DIMMs to do
the work of one ECC DIMM. I don't know if this even applies to PS/2's though.

Q) 5.7 What cache size do I have/can I upgrade to?

See the listing in section 1.2. As far as upgrading only the Type 1 can be
upgraded with L2 cache I believe, all the rest either have it or don't.

S) 6.0 Diagnostics

Q) 6.1 What do the POST beeps mean?

Beep(s) Errant device
No beep Power supply, system board
1 short beep System OK
2 short beeps POST Error displayed on monitor
Repeating short beeps Power supply, system board
3 long beeps 3270 keyboard card
1 long, 1 short beeps System board
1 long, 2 short beeps Display adapter (MDA, CGA)
1 long, 3 short beeps EGA
Continuous beep Power supply, system board


Q) 6.2 What do the POST codes mean?

Note if errors are encountered with the reference disk in the drive they will
be identified.

See Appendix D for full listing.


Q) 6.3 Why when my system boots fine sometimes the reference disk
diagnostics report errors?

This is usually a case of non-IBM components added to the system. Some
examples are video adapters, hard drive controllers, and the like. In most
cases, POST is always right and the reference disk is tricked into thinking
there is a problem so don't have a heart attack when it gives you the:
'Replace system board' message it could just be a normal option generated
error. Also lock-ups are common with some video cards added to the system.


Q) 6.4 How can I *REALLY* find out if these errors are just bogus?

The *EASY* method if your system hangs on the full tests is to enter -A
from the reference disk main menu and select the test it hung up on. If
everything checks out then no problem.

If you want it to run the full test without hanging the only method is to
remove each card and reboot with the reference disk allow it to auto-configure
and then reboot and run the reference disk tests. If the system hangs now
then there is a problem with the system not related to added options, contact
IBM or a repair tech promptly and try not to use the machine until it is
looked at.


Q) 6.5 OK I got a problem, who can I get to fix it?

Solutronix [closed as of 10/28/98], 7255 Flying Cloud Dr., Eden Prairie, MN
55344; 800-875-2580. In one example, they replaced the video driver chip and
several "likely to fail" chips. The repair, including shipping, cost $295.
All repairs are warranted for six months, even if it is not related to the
original fault.

Micro Exchange [closed as of 10/28/98], 682 Passaic Avenue, Nutley, NJ 07110,
(201)284-1200, FAX (201)284-1550. They have always been very professional in
all of our transactions. They sell used/demo and some new parts as well as
doing repairs. In February their rates for system board repairs were:

8570/20MHz $145 8570/25MHz $155 8573 $225
8580/16MHz $160 8580/20MHz $165 8580/25MHz $170
8590 $275 8595 $325

Their warranty and repair offering is very similar to Solutronix.

In early 1993 IBM introduced the Personal Systems Card Repair service [closed
as of 10/28/98]. The number is 800-759-6995, and their address is:

IBM
Attn: PSCR
11400 Burnet Road
Austin, TX 78758-3493

They offer 24-hour and 5-day turn-around service (the difference in price is
about $50), and the repairs carry the typical IBM 1-year warranty.

Anyone know of a good repair facility??? They are all currently closed.


Q) 6.6 What are the wrap plugs the reference disk sometimes refers too?

In order to perform a total test of the ports (when running IBM diagnostics)
you need to provide the incoming signals to the port via a wrap plug. The
constructions of each (serial and parallel) are listed below:


PARALLEL PORT WRAP PLUG

To construct this wrap plug use a DB25 male connector. Utilizing a minimum
of 30AWG wire make connections as listed below:

pin 1 to 13

pin 2 to 15

pin 10 to 16

pin 11 to 17

pin 12 to 14

Then before running the diagnostics attach the DB25 to the parallel port.

SERIAL PORT WRAP PLUG

To construct this wrap plug use a standard RS232 DB25 female connector and
wire these pins together. Also using a minimum of 30AWG wire.

Updated via Brian Lee (blee@fish.share.net) who read the IBM FAX page.

pin 2 to 3

pin 4 to 5

pin 5 to 8

pin 6 to 20

pin 20 to 22

Then attach this to the serial port before running the diagnostics.

Please note I have not tested this on an actual PS/2, but this does work on
standard ports and PS/2s don't have any propriety-type pins on the serial or
parallel ports. Can someone let me know if these are the right 'loops'?


S) 7.0 Misc

Q) 7.1 What is the pin out for ...?

This is my attempt to have every pinout on a PS/2 listed and named. At worst
this will solve the problem of someone referring to a DB9 as 'The little port
with some holes in it and in a 'D' on its side shape' :). And at best it will
provide the information to build cables yourself and hybridize certain cable
sets.

See Appendix E for listing.


Q) 7.2 What is the special SCSI connector by IBM?

I have just bought a third-party SCSI cable for my PS/2, and it works. It
allows you to connect the 60-pin PS/2 SCSI adapter external connection to any
device with a standard 50-pin Centronics connector. So, there are three
options for getting this type of connector. By the way, the PS/2 SCSI
connector is the same as the one on the RS6000. Of course, the alternative
to all this is to use an internal SCSI device, if possible. The IBM internal
SCSI connections are the same as those found in internal SCSI devices (the
50-pin rectangular connector).


FIRST OPTION:

Buy the IBM cable from your IBM dealer. The part number is 32G4143. It will
cost about $49.


SECOND OPTION:

Buy a third-party cable. I bought mine from Storage Solutions [closed as of
10/28/98]. Their number is (203)325-0035. Mine cost $75 for a 5' cable.
Storage Solutions call the IBM connector a "60-pin compressed" connector
(though they are not really pins - it's really a kind of edge connector).
They also know what you're talking about if you just call it an RS6000 SCSI
cable.

Inmac (1-800-323-6905) also sells them (see their UnixSelect catalog). They
call it a Mini-Centronics (60) connector. They charge a bit more than Storage
Solutions.

There are probably other suppliers. The key piece of information is that it
is
the same connector as on RS6000 machines. The IBM connector is *not* a Mini-
SCSI connector. Not all suppliers know this, and they will try to sell you
Mini-SCSI (which has 50 pins and is smaller than the IBM connector).

THIRD SOLUTION:

Make your own. The SCSI connector is available from AMP (1-800-522-6752 or
1-800-526-5142 or (717)564-0100). The AMP part number is 557025-6 (not to be
confused with the 557025-5, which is the same connector, but without
thumbscrews to hold it in the SCSI port). AMP also calls it a CHAMP .050
Series III Plug Cable Connector. I was unable to find any AMP dealers who
could supply this. I had to get it straight from AMP. And it would have been
so complicated for them to supply one as a normal order that they sent me one
as a free sample. In the end I didn't use it though. It turned out to be
almost impossible to solder. It is designed to have each of the tiny SCSI
wires forced into a slot that automatically strips the cable. You'd need a
special tool to do that. By the way, I bought a cheap SCSI cable and cut one
end off, so that I wouldn't have to solder the other end as well.

From Louis Ohland :

What about the internal cable for the Fast/Wide SCSI? I'm getting
close to getting the flat, .025 pitch cable and the AMP HPDB68
786090-7,http://connect.amp.com/AMP/bin/AMP.
Connect?C=1&M=BYPN&PN=786090-7&button.x=71&button.y=7

The biggest problem is finding the Molex mini-centronics (called
half-pitch) 71660, http://www.molex.com/product/micro/71660i.html

After two months, I have THREE coming....

Another thing is the 50 pin edgecard connector for the IBM
controller. Available from Dalco and Jameco...Dalco part 40720
http://www.dalco.com/cgi-bin/nph-tame.exe/dalco/conrib.tam?cart=98J18bnw.
hyn&lpg=/dalco/cable5.tam&lpt=908737312.


Q) 7.3 Where are benchmark programs located. What do they mean?

Benchmarks programs are a good way to compare systems and even better to see
how changes to a system affect it, however, it is unreliably to compare
benchmarks to other benchmarks (even if the programs are the same) unless the
same environments are used.

A very good and pretty much the standard benchmark program is COMPTEST version
2.59 is the latest on 10/94). This is excellent to compare system to system
and describes how to set up the autoexec and config files to run the test
under. This is the control variable and allows apples to be compared to
apples. This is a public domain program and probably the best in its class.

Other standards are somewhat variable as to what they will rate your system as
A LOT of hardware manufacturers (esp. video card) are setting up benchmark
'sniffers' on their hardware to give back excellent numbers to the common
types of benchmark tests. I would like a list of benchmarks known to be
sniffed' for and the hardware that does 'sniff'. The best way to prevent
this is to make new benchmark test constantly and not to buy the benchmark
programs whose creators share what the tests look for with the manufacturers
before they come out. What happens is X-company is coming out with a new
benchmark program, then Hardware R Us requests the parameters of the testing
and figures out what to send back to the benchmarking software to get FAST
but REALISTIC marks. Usually the benchmark company is affiliated with the
hardware company so both benefit.


S) 8.0 Operating Systems (OS)

Q) 8.1 Can I run UNIX on my PS/2? Which UNIX variety works?

According to C. Beauregard:

Currently, most of the common disk controllers are supported: IBM SCSI,
IBM ESDI, AHA-1640, Buslogic, Future Domain. X Windows runs under XGA,
XGA-2, 8514, VGA, etc. Network cards include 3c523, 3c529, assorted
WD/SMC, IBM Ethernet Adapter/A, and a few ethernet, Token ring, and :)
Arcnet. Basically, it's running on almost all MCA machines in one form or
another including most PS/2s, NCRs, Apricot, and some other extremenly
weird configurations (An IBM P390 300Mhz Pentium Pro with 1Gb of RAM, for
example).

The 2.0.x kernel series is supported via patches available at glycerine.
As well, MCA support is now in the 2.1.x kernel (well, with a few bugs),
meaning MCA hardware will be fully supported in Linux 2.2, although
support from specific distributions will probably come a little slower.
The exception is Debian, which has had complete MCA support since 2.0.

There's also been some work done on NetBSD for MCA, and Bob Eager is
working on some other BSD support. Linux, of course, is way ahead of the
game.


Q) 8.2 Why won't certain UNIXs run on my PS/2?

The only thing that stops anything type of program from running on a PS/2
that would normally run on any other machine with the same CPU/memory etc
are usually the device drivers. In the case of UNIX more than likely it is
just a matter of obtaining the correct disk drivers. If you have ESDI and
want to run LINUX there is a ESDI fix available. If you have a SCSI that is
compatible with any of the supported drivers you are ok also. Currently
there is a large Linux/MCA following and Linux is by itself a great OS...
32 bit and totally stable.

For questions on Linux/MCA go to:
http://glycerine.itsmm.uni.edu/mca.


Q) 8.3 What is better for the PS/2, MSDOS or PCDOS?

I would have to say it is a toss-up. In one hand, PC-DOS supplies special
programs that are optimized for/unique to the PS/2 and may be helpful, but
then
you have the problem that something may not be compatible with the MS-DOS
standard. By purchasing MS-DOS, you may not get the special programs you need
to run certain diagnostics, and procedures on your PS/2, but you do get a 100%
compatible DOS. Buy whichever you think you will need, PC-DOS should be
more than 98% compatible with anything MS-DOS has, but if you have something
in that 2% incompatible area the decision is practically made for you.

Another note is that DOS is on its way out in the form we know it today.
The routines and procedures are being incorporated into GUIs (Graphical
User Interfaces) like Windows, OS/2, and of course as always UNIX.
If you are still one holding out on running Windows or OS/2 you really
should start as soon as you get far behind in the realm of OS's and it
will be hard to catch up.

Actually DOS is out...run Windows 95/98 or UNIX/LINUX if possible and don't
worry about it unless you are running applications that rely on a DOS version
that does not run under Windows 98 or UNIX/LINUX or you need a low disk space
OS.


Q) 8.4 Can I run Windows? What would I need?

Any PS/2 with the basic requirements can run all of the standard OS's,
such as OS/2 and Windows, even Windows for Workgroups and Win95. Just
make sure you read the box carefully and that your machine has all the
requirements. Even though Windows and other OS's can run in 2-3 MB it
is wise to at least have 4MB and 8MB is a more comfortable range. Try
to get as much RAM as possible as the more RAM you have the faster/more
efficiently your machine will run.

One system.ini line that should be added for the PS/2 user is under the
Enh 386 section, add the line InitPS2MouseAtExit=False. This prevents
Windows from reinitializing the mouse on a PS/2 and thus causing a 5-10
second delay.


Q) 8.5 Can I run Win95/98? What would I need?

For Win95 if your system meets the CPU, memory and hard drive space
requirements (386DX20 or better, 4MB, and 10-87 MB of hard drive space + 14MB
- system memory for the swap file)...Load it and go. That is really all there
is to say. The one thing Microsoft has down is making it easy to install
their software. If you can run 3.1 or 3.11, Win 95 should also work and be
faster.

As to Win98, the I have heard it does not support the PS/2 line well and to
avoid it. Louis Ohland recently stated this too. I still run Win95 on my
regular machines as Win98 seems abrasive to me. There is nothing OSR2 does
not have that I would want from Win98. BTW if anyone has OSR2.5 (or the
latest version) I really would like it.

Special solution to XGA/2 related problem (happened on Model 77, don't know if
other models are effected). From pester69@hotmail.com

I've got a tip I found out about from ps2guru@geocities.com.

Scenario:
You've got a PS/2 77 running xga2 and Win95 but when you shut down to dos
the screen goes completely blank.

Solution:
1) Go into Windows Explorer, look in the "windows" folder for an icon marked
"Exit to DOS".
2) Using the right mouse button, click the icon, and choose "properties".
3) Click the "Program" tab. In the "cmd line" box,place the cursor at the end
of the
C:\...command.com, add a space, then the switch "/k mode co80". Click
"Apply", then "OK"


Q) 8.6 Can I run Linux now?

Almost 100% of the time providing you are at least running a 386. Almost
every SCSI card is supported. And if you can't run the latest kernel the
invaders kernel (ftp://invaders.dcrl.nd.edu) usually will run and is very
full-featured itself.


S) 9.0 References

Q) 9.1 Who makes upgrades for a PS/2 computer (company phone #'s)

Advanced Microcomputer Systems, Inc.
1460 SW 3rd Street, Suite B-8
Pompano Beach, FL 33069
1-800-972-3733
(305) 784-0900
Fax sheet available
(I/O cards: 1-4 normal and fast serial cards, parallel and Extended Parallel

Port (EPP) cards)

AOX 800-232-1269/800-726-0269 [no longer open 10/28/98]
MicroMax 386/16MB and MCA Master (486/64MB $575)

BLUE STAR USA
7 October Hill, Suite 4
Holliston, MA 01746
(508) 429-3001
(508) 429-3007 Fax
www.bluestarusa.com
Extensive listing of IBM parts, however must know the IBM FRU as there are no
descriptions.

Business Computer Products
401 Venture Drive, Suite C
S. Daytona, FL 32119
1-904-760-9300
PS/2 accessory mounting supplies and hardware

ChipChat
Dearborn, Michigan
1-313-565-4000
(ChipChat sound cards and MicroRAM SC memory cards)

CompuD 800-929-9333
818-787-2074
818-787-1956
www.compu-d.com (check under the liquidation heading)
PS/2 supplier

Computer Discount Warehouse 800-726-4239
CPU upgrades

Cyrix
2703 N Central Expressway
Richardson, TX 75080
(800)GO-CYRIX (462-9749)
386 to 486 upgrade processors
Co-Processors

DakTech 800-325-3238
PS/2 N.O.S and parts

Evergreen Technologies Inc.
915 NW 8th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330
(800)733-0934
(503)757-0934
(503)757-7350 Fax
Processor upgrades (AMD 586/133 (about a Pentium 75 $129 direct, ~$70
through
CompUSA, Fry's, or Circuit City)

First Source 800-692-9866
www.firstsource.com

Future Domain 800-879-7599 [no longer in business as of 10/28/98]
BBS 714-588-6870
MCS-600 and MCS-700 SCSI controllers (offering 32 bit file/disk access in
windows)

General Technics
PO Box 2676
38 Raynor Avenue
Ronkonkoma, NY 11779-6618
1-800-GT-SALE-8
(hard drives, memory, modems, processors, cd-roms, etc.)

GOODRICH, HANSON & ASSOCIATES, INC.
(GHACORP) (a Dun & Bradstreet rated company)
302-324-1650 | E-Mail<71520.2701@compuserve.com>
Terms: PO's from qualified organizations, COD/cash/MO/Personal Check, Prepaid
This company seems to offer very good deals on closed out items and a
lot is PS/2 merchandise. Lately good deals on modem accelerators and BL3

chips. [as of 10/29/98 I only got voice mail and no call back].

H.Co
16812 Hale Ave
Irvine, CA 92714
(800)726-2477
(714)833-3222
Fax (714)833-3389
All types of processor upgrades from 286 up
RAM and memory cards

IBM Boulder Parts Plant 800-388-7080

IBM PS/2 Tech Support 800-772-2227 (800 number no longer applies to PS/2's)
All PS/2 Tech support (24hours)
If out of warranty 1-900-555-2582 $1.99/min (first min. free)
Or $35 per incident...ouch I guess the $20k for my model 80 did not
include Lifetime support....
(Thanks for the dhart@freenet.grfn.org)

IBM Factory Outlet 800-426-7015

Kahlon 800-317-9989
www.kahlon.com
PS/2 Supplier works with some large universities (they may be able to
order for you at a discount)

Kingston Technology Corporation
17600 Newhope Street
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(800)835-6575
(714)435-2600
(714)435-2699
Fax:???
Hard disk (DataCard combined hardcard/memory card)upgrades
Processor upgrades (SLC/Now!, 486/Now!, TC5x86/133 $99, MCMaster
discontinued)
Memory

Micro Exchange [closed as of 10/28/98]
682 Passaic Avenue
Nutley, NJ 07110
(201)284-1200
FAX (201)284-1550
PS/2 repair.

True Blue Parts (f/k/a Micro Mart)
Trueblueparts@mindspring.com
1-508-833-2225
Memory, motherboards (Model 80-Axx for only $60)

Page Computers 800-886-0055
All PS/2 parts and systems, new/used.

PC Parts 800-666-9373
www.pcpartsinc.com

Piper Research, Inc.
Attn: Sales
PO Box 241
Newport, MN 55055
1-612-459-2770
FAX: 1-612-881-5840
Tech support BBS: 1-612-730-5860
FAX: 1-408-428-6633
E-Mail: 74544.3103@compuserve.com
www.piper-research.com
Offers MCA SoundBlaster compatible card.

Quarterdeck
QEMM memory manager
MCA support file updates are at:
http://www.qdeck.com/technote/mca.html


Recycled Computer Parts 972-484-6447

Reply Corporation [out of business 10/28/98, but products can be obtained
through www.neointeractive.com]
4435 Fortran Drive
San Jose, CA 95134
(800)955-5295
(408)956-2732
Fax (408)942-4897
Processor upgrades
Hard disk upgrades
Motherboards with VLB

SOS
1-800-767-2554 (Jason in Sales)
Hard disk drives, Motherboards, Memory, systems, and misc.
(Model 80 1.44MB drives for $15)

Solutronix 800-875-2580 [closed as of 10/28/98]
PS/2 repair


Q) 9.2 Is there automated FAX help available?

[From: Aron Eisenpress ]

IBM Personal Computer Company Automated Fax System
Complete Catalog Dated: 01/31/1995
800-IBM-3395
Revised by author for PS/2 related only FAXes
Let me know if I omitted something you feel important to PS/2s

Doc
Num Document Description Pages
----- ----------------------------------------------------- -----
11498 * Options By IBM: Auto 16/4 Token-Ring Adapters 4
11495 * Options By IBM: Serial Infrared Adapters 4
11650 * Options By IBM: Video/Graphics Memory Upgrades 2
20046 Comm: Artic Specs - Interrupts, Jumpers & Pinouts 12
20004 Comm: ARTIC X.25 Interface, X.21 bis/V.24 Pinouts 1
20012 Comm: Artic, Dual Port, V.35 Cable Pin Assignments 1
20053 Comm: ASCII Terminal Cable - RS-232C (9 Pin) Pinout 1
20094 Comm: AT Commands Set 3
20051 Comm: Cabling Issues and Port Pinouts 2
20007 Comm: Dual Asynch Adapter Pinouts 1
20032 Comm: Dual Asynch I/O Addresses 1
12535 Comm: PC Artic Adapter - Diagnostics Hints 2
12534 Comm: PC ARTIC(RIC) Switch Settings/Jumper Locations 1
13403 Comm: WaveRunner Digital Modem 4
20045 Comm: X.21/V.35 Cable Pinouts & V.35 Pin Assignments 2
14010 DOS: Changing Hard Drive Partition Size 1
13034 DRM: PS/2 E - Pricing Information - (4-5-94) 2
13095 DRM: PS/2 Server 95 - Pricing (8-23-94) 1
10809 EduQuest: PS/2 Tape - Tips and Techniques 2
16023 Misc: ADF File Number Cross Reference 11
36008 Misc: IBM Phone Numbers (Voice, BBS & Fax) 4
16008 Misc: Mouse Port Pinouts 1
20031 Misc: Multi Protocol Adapter and SDLC Pinout 1
20005 Misc: Mwave,Windsurfer Communications Adapter User 10
36009 Misc: Phone Listing - Voice, BBS, & Fax - OEM 5
20010 Misc: RS-232-C-Interface Pin Assignments 1
16005 Misc: SCSI Hard Drive Switch Settings 1
11098 Misc: Video Capture Adapter/A 4
16021 Misc: Video Port Pinouts 2
20804 Misc: Wrap Plug (Loopback) Wiring Pinouts 1
11359 Misc: XGA - 2 Product Information 4
16007 Misc: XGA - Adapter Scan and Refresh Rates 1
16037 Misc: XGA - Installation of XGA Adapter/A 1
14067 Misc: XGA-Understanding XGA-XGA vs. 8514/A-Installing 2
11089 Multimedia: M-Audio Capture & Playback Adap & Adap/A 4
11090 Multimedia: M-Motion Video Adap/A & M-Control Prgm/2 4
22003 Multimedia: M-Motion Video Adapter/A Connections 1
11230 Multimedia: M-Motion Video Adptr/A & M-Control Prgm/2 3
10109 Network: 16/4 Busmaster EISA Adapter 2
25002 Network: Token Ring Diagnostic On PS/2 Server 295 1
14023 Network: Token Ring Pinouts 4
11220 Network: Token-Ring Network 16/4 Adapter/A Busmaster 2
15054 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide - Configuration 2
15057 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide - Solving Problems 2
15058 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide-Help & Service Info 2
15052 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide-Install Adapter 3
15053 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide-Install SCSI Device 2
15051 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide-Installing Drivers 2
15055 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide-Multiple SCSI Adpts 2
15056 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide-SCSI Controller 2
15049 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide-System Programs 2
15050 OBI: MCA SCSI Adapter User Guide-Update Ref. Disk 2
11473 Options By IBM: MCA SCSI-2 Adapters - Glossy 4
11462 Options By IBM: SIMM & DIMM Memory Products 6
11455 Options By IBM: WaveRunner Digital Modems - Glossy 6
11260 PS Quick Reference - PS/2 Models (AT BUS) 1
11261 PS Quick Reference - PS/2 Models (MCA) 08/17/94 14
60027 PS/2 REF: Bus Architectures 1
60053 PS/2 REF: Displays Reference (Low end-active matrix) 1
60050 PS/2 REF: Displays Reference (P series/95xx) 1
60056 PS/2 REF: Displays Reference (Technology) 1
60052 PS/2 REF: Displays Reference (Touch) 1
60051 PS/2 REF: Displays Reference (V series/63xx) 1
60055 PS/2 REF: Displays Reference (withdrawn - 1 of 2) 1
60064 PS/2 REF: Ethernet, FDDI, ARCNET 1
60081 PS/2 REF: IBM Displays (withdrawn - 2 of 2) 1
60075 PS/2 REF: IBM Displays S/S 1
60079 PS/2 REF: IBM SCSI Disks (2 GB or higher) 1
60023 PS/2 REF: IBM SCSI Disks (up to 1.12 GB) 1
60065 PS/2 REF: IBM Server 500 1
60001 PS/2 REF: IBM Servers 1
60066 PS/2 REF: IBM Servers - withdrawn 1
60080 PS/2 REF: IBM ThinkPad Options 1
60026 PS/2 REF: Local Bus Architectures - I 1
60062 PS/2 REF: Local Bus Architectures - II 1
60005 PS/2 REF: Model 90 and 95 Processor Complexes 1
60054 PS/2 REF: Monochrome and Image 1
60031 PS/2 REF: OS/2 2.1 compared to Windows 3.1 1
60030 PS/2 REF: OS/2 2.1 compared to Windows NT 1
60029 PS/2 REF: OS/2 2.1 Overview 1
60033 PS/2 REF: OS/2 LAN Server 1.3 and 2.0 1
60034 PS/2 REF: OS/2 LAN Server 3.0 1
60008 PS/2 REF: OverDrive Processors 1
60067 PS/2 REF: PC 300-486 models 1
60072 PS/2 REF: PC 300-P60 models 1
60068 PS/2 REF: PC 330 and 350 (Pentium) 1
60073 PS/2 REF: PC 700 PCCI/ISA models 1
60074 PS/2 REF: PC 700 PCI/MCA models 1
60069 PS/2 REF: PC 730 and PC 750 (PCI/ISA) 1
60070 PS/2 REF: PC 730 and PC 750 (PCI/MCA) 1
60016 PS/2 REF: PC Processors (386SX to Blue Lightning) 1
60017 PS/2 REF: PC Processors (486 family) 1
60061 PS/2 REF: PC Processors (Blue Lightning DX2) 1
60018 PS/2 REF: PC Processors (Pentium) 1
60002 PS/2 REF: PC Server (PCI/EISA Server) 1
60000 PS/2 REF: Personal Systems Ref. Index Version 77 1
60020 PS/2 REF: PowerPC Processors (601, 603) 1
60082 PS/2 REF: PowerPC Processors (604,620) 1
60019 PS/2 REF: PowerPC Processors (Overview) 1
60058 PS/2 REF: Printers Reference 1
60021 PS/2 REF: Processor Performance 1
60009 PS/2 REF: PS/2 (53 to 57) 1
60010 PS/2 REF: PS/2 (76 to 90) 1
60014 PS/2 REF: PS/2 E 1
60011 PS/2 REF: PS/2 Model 53 1
60012 PS/2 REF: PS/2 Model 56 and 57 1
60013 PS/2 REF: PS/2 Model 76 and 77 (i/s) 1
60015 PS/2 REF: PS/2 Reference (Ultimedia-withdrawn) 1
60006 PS/2 REF: PS/2 Server 195 1
60007 PS/2 REF: PS/2 Server 295 1
60025 PS/2 REF: RAID(Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) 1
60022 PS/2 REF: SCSI and IDE Technology 1
60060 PS/2 REF: SCSI Controllers (Micro Channel) 1
60024 PS/2 REF: SCSI Controllers (non Micro Channel) 1
60063 PS/2 REF: SCSI Disks - Withdrawn 1
60003 PS/2 REF: Server 85 1
60004 PS/2 REF: Server 95 (Base 4 models) 1
60049 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 300, 500, 700, 700C - withdrawn 1
60048 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 350, 350C, 500 1
60047 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 360 1
60076 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 360CSE/CE 1
60046 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 710T, 720, 720C 1
60045 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 730T 1
60044 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 750 1
60043 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 755 1
60078 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 755CD 1
60077 PS/2 REF: ThinkPad 755CSE/CE 1
60035 PS/2 REF: Token-Ring, 100VG-AnyLAN, ATM 1
60099 PS/2 REF: Trademarks 1
60039 PS/2 REF: ValuePoint - Fall 1993 models 1
60036 PS/2 REF: ValuePoint - Spring 1994 models 1
60040 PS/2 REF: ValuePoint Reference (Fall 1993 models) 1
60038 PS/2 REF: ValuePoint Reference (P60/D models) 1
60042 PS/2 REF: ValuePoint Reference (Si models) 1
60037 PS/2 REF: ValuePoint Reference (Spring 1994 models) 1
60041 PS/2 REF: ValuePoint Si 1
60057 PS/2 REF: Video Reference 1
60028 PS/2 REF: Why IBM is a better buy than a clone 1
16074 PS/2: 25 Pin Serial Port Pin Outs 1
12056 PS/2: 25-Pin D-Shell Connector - Printer Adapter 1
11342 PS/2: 3.5 Inch Enhanced Rewritable Optical Drive 2
12050 PS/2: 30286 Power Supply Connector 2
11217 PS/2: 3510 & 3511 External Enclosure 2
12055 PS/2: 40-Pin Card-Edge & 34-Pin Header Interface 2
11405 PS/2: 486SLC3 Processor Upgrade for 56/57 Systems 1
12005 PS/2: 5.25" Rewritable Optical Disk Cartridge 1
11620 PS/2: 53 53LS 486SLC2 1
11056 PS/2: 56 SLC, LS 56 SX and 56 LS - Glossy 4
11057 PS/2: 57 486SLC2 57SLC - Glossy 4
11119 PS/2: 76-486 - Glossy 4
11604 PS/2: 76/77 Options Fax Sheet 3
11603 PS/2: 76/77 Spec Sheet 7
11162 PS/2: 77 486DX2 & 77486SX 4
16058 PS/2: 90 XP 486 Information 2
11013 PS/2: 90 XP 486 Series 6
14065 PS/2: 90/95 - Selective Boot Assignments 1
11093 PS/2: 90XP 486 Series 5
11073 PS/2: 95 High Performance Servers - Overview 19
11071 PS/2: 95 XP 486 50 MHz Server Information 5
11014 PS/2: 95 XP 486 Series 6
11026 PS/2: 9553 53 486SLC2 & 53LS 486SLC2 Empower the 4
11159 PS/2: 9556 486SLC2, 56SLC & 56SLC LS - Glossy 4
11406 PS/2: 9556, 9556LS, 9557, & M57 486SLC3 - Glossy 5
11338 PS/2: ActionMedia II The Digital Future of Multimedia 11
16069 PS/2: Cached Processor Option for Models 56/57 Guide 7
11079 PS/2: Carton Replacements 1
14036 PS/2: Comparison of 386SX/386SL/386SLC/386, 486SX/486 1
16016 PS/2: Diskette Drive Connector - 34 Pin 1
16002 PS/2: Diskette Drive Pinouts - 40 Pin Card Edge 1
16036 PS/2: Diskette Drive Signal Assingments - 40 Pin Card 1
12008 PS/2: Drive Type Table 1
16001 PS/2: External Diskette Drive Cable Pinouts 1
11001 PS/2: Facts and Features before April 1992 - Glossy 10
20019 PS/2: Fax Concentrator Adapter/A 2
16027 PS/2: Hard Drive Parameters for AT & PS/2 Products 1
11282 PS/2: High-Performance Plannar (Processor) Upgrades 4
11629 PS/2: IBM Personal Systems(R) Desktop Systems 11
16076 PS/2: Installation - Storage Media and Devices 8
16067 PS/2: Installation Planning - Health and Safety 4
16070 PS/2: Installation Plannning - Surge Protection 2
11212 PS/2: Integrated Server 85 - Glossy 4
11168 PS/2: Large Storage Options 6
16077 PS/2: Line Current Calculations 3
16066 PS/2: Memory Options - Quick Reference 3
11036 PS/2: Memory Options Guide as of 1-13-94 19
16075 PS/2: Micro Channel Architecture Features/Functions 3
16086 PS/2: Model 70 System Board Diskette Drive Connectors 1
11012 PS/2: Model 80 386 6
12021 PS/2: Model L40 Data/Fax Modem Operating Instructions 7
14068 PS/2: Model L40SX - Battery Concerns 2
12006 PS/2: Model L40SX - Battery Life Guide 4
12019 PS/2: Model L40SX - Hints and Tips 4
11078 PS/2: Most Commonly Ordered Publications 1
11249 PS/2: New PS/2 Models 56&57 - General Information 1
12072 PS/2: Note Information 1
14081 PS/2: Notebook / Laptop / Portable - Comparisons 2
11155 PS/2: One Day Adapter Card Repair 3
16011 PS/2: Parallel Port Pinouts 1
11032 PS/2: PCMCIA Adapter/2 2
16048 PS/2: Pin Assignmnts - Video & Printer/Scanner Cables 1
11602 PS/2: Planar Upgrade Spec Sheet 2
16079 PS/2: Planning - Non-Office Computer Environment 6
16019 PS/2: Power Connector Voltages (At-Bus and MCA) 3
11479 PS/2: PS/2 E - A New Dimension - Glossy 2
12045 PS/2: PS/2 TV - Connecting A VCR 3
11095 PS/2: PS/2 TV - Glossy 4
22009 PS/2: PS/2 TV - Installation Information 3
16003 PS/2: Reference Diskette Versions 1
11021 PS/2: SCSI 6
16014 PS/2: SCSI Adapter Pinouts 1
16029 PS/2: SCSI Adapters 1
16110 PS/2: SCSI Hard Disk Drive - Product Description 2
12047 PS/2: Service Hints System Boards, Hard Disks & Clock 1
11480 PS/2: Specs 4
14079 PS/2: System BIOS Information 2
14035 PS/2: System Update Diskette - DASDDRVR.SYS 1
16031 PS/2: Tape 2.0 - Restore Command 1
16087 PS/2: The Benefits of MCA Versus At-Bus 3
11154 PS/2: TMC-850 IBM SCSI Adapter Option Kits 2
11184 PS/2: Touch Select - Glossy 3
11166 PS/2: Ultimedia Family 6
22005 PS/2: Ultimedia Model M57 SLC - Glossy 4
14064 PS/2: Understanding Model Numbers 2
11420 Servers: PS/2 Powerful Network Servers-General Info 1
11376 Servers: PS/2 Server 195 - Glossy 8
11171 Servers: PS/2 Server 295 -Glossy 8
11121 Servers: PS/2 Server 85 - Glossy 4
11358 Servers: PS/2 Server 85 466 AND 433 - Glossy 6
11293 Servers: PS/2 Server 95 560 and 466 - Glossy 6
11356 Servers: PS/2 Server 95 Array 566,560 & 466 - Glossy 6
11210 Servers: PS/ValuePoint Mini-Tower 2


Appendix A MCA Brand Cards and Parts

IBMPN Name/Description

EMULATORS

74F3465 3270 LOCAL BOARD/A: IBM 3270 for 50,50Z,55SX,60,65SX,70 & 80. Half
sized. Replaces 53F6384/25F8448/74F3459/
74F4460.

69X6279 5250 LOCAL BD/A: IBM System 36/38, AS400 Workstation Emulator.
Half sized. Direct Twinax. Req. Software and
Cable.

69X6287 5250 LOCAL KT/A: As above with Software and Cable.

6451114 ADPT MULTI PROTO/A: Multi-protocol for SNA/SDLC, BSC and
asynchronous environments. Req. additional
Hard and Software.

LAN

1501223 ADPT BASEBAND/A: Baseband NIC (Network Interface Card). 1 per
CPU on network. 2megabits/sec trans.

59G8998 LANSTREAM ADPT MC16: LANStreamer 16 bit. 4 or 16 Mbps over
unshielded twisted pair or IBM cable. Need
6339098 cable to attach to TRN network. RPL
standard.

92F8942 LANSTREAM ADPT MC32: LANStreamer 32 bit.


74F9410 TRN 16/4 ADAP/A: Token-Ring Network 16/4 Adapter. Half sized.
4 or 16 Mbps. Req. 6339098 cable. Replaces
16F1133.

69X8138 TRN ADAP/A: Token-Ring for NIC network. 4Mbps. Req. TR
adapter and LAN.

COMMUNICATION

09F1897 IBM ARTIC M/2 512K: Realtime Interface Co-Processor Multiport/2.

00F5531 IBM ARTIC M/2 I/F CB: Multiport Interface 3 meter Cable. Attaches
to the ARTIC 8 port interface board.

16F1820 IBM ARTIC M/2 1MB: Realtime Interface Co-Processor Multiport/2.
Req. DOS or OS/2 support, and cables or
interface card.

16F1858 IBM X.25 CO PROC/2: IBM X.25 Co-Processor/2 communications
adapter. 512K memory, supports v.24, v.35, and
x.21 non-switched with appropriate cable.

16F1869 IBM X.25 CBL OPT V24: IBM X.25 Cable Option v.24. Connects from back
of the X.25 interface Co-Processor (16F1858)
to modem

16F1871 IBM X.25 CBL OPT V35: IBM X.25 Cable Option v.35. 10'cable with wrap
plug. For 16F1858.

6451013 IBM DUAL ASYNC /A: IBM Dual Asynchronous Adapter /A. Greater
comm. speed when used with OS/2. 2 independent
RS-232 ports, max of 3 9pin male. Req. one
expansion slot.


ADVANCED VIDEO

69F9734 ACTIONMEDIA CAPTURE: ActionMedia II Capture Option for AMII
adapters 69F9730 (ISA) and 69F9732 (MCA). Adds
NTSC/PAL video/audio inputs and recording
ability.

69F9732 ACTIONMEDIA II/A 2MB: ActionMedia II Video Adapter/A 2MB VRAM.
Playback digitized DVI full-motion video and
audio w/o ext. video/audio. Superimpose VGA
graphics on video. Recording req. 69F9734.

35G4712 IMGE ADAP/A 1MB UPGR: PS/2 Image Adapter 1MB. Use with ImagePlus
Workstation. Supports 1600x1200 mono and
1280x1024 color. Compatable with VGA and
8514/A modes. Supports 8506/7/8 displays.
Printer option use 07F4402.

35G4713 IMGE APAP/A 3MB UPGR: As above but 1280x1024x256.

07F4406 IMGE ADP/A MEM EXP K: Use with 44F9914 Image Adpt/A to expand
resolution to 1600x1280x16 greys.

07F4402 IMGE ADP/A PRTR OPT: Printer Scanner Option used with 44F9914 Image
Adapt/A to attach 3812002 Printer, 4216020
Printer 3117 and 3118 Scanner.

92F3379 M-MOTION VID ADPT/A: M-Motion Video Adapter/A. Full-motion video,
Still-image video, and audio. Superimpose VGA
graphics over video. Up to 3 NTSC inputs. Req.
04G3544 software.

92F3380 VIDEO CAPTURE ADPT/A: Video Capture Adapter/A. Allows viewing
and/or digitizing of STILL images from NTSC
source.

87F4773 IBM ADPT XGA-2/A: PS/2 XGA-2 Display Adapter/A. 16/32 bit bus
master, req. i386SX and higher. 1280x1024
max resolution, 256 colors. Refresh up to
75MHz. More than double performance of
75X5887.

75X5889 IBM MEM EXP KT XGA/A: PS/2 Video Memory Expansion Option. For all
PS/2 models supported by 75X5887 XGA display
adapter. Upgrade to 1MB of video memory for
1024x768x256 color support.

75X5887 IBM ADPT XGA/A: PS/2 XGA Display Adapter/A. 1024x768
Interlaced resolution. Use 75X5887 memory
option for 1024x768x256NI support.

49G2716 IMGE I ADP/A: PS/2 Image Adapter for use with 9504001,
6091191 and 9517001 monitors.

ADVANCED AUDIO

60G3879 AUDIOVATION ADPT/A: Audiovation Adapter/A. SoundBlaster
Compatable. MPC. 16 bit audio with sampling up
to 44.1Khz.

92F3379 M-AUDIO CAPT ADAPT/A: M-Audio Capture Adapter/A. Captures,
digitizes, and plays back high quality audio.
Digitial audio processing, including
compression/decompression.

PROCESSOR UPGRADES

32G3279 50Z PLANAR BOARD: Planar upgrade for 50 and 50Z. Complete system
board w/ IBM 486SLC2-50. Built in SVGA w/ 1MB.
Uses existing drives. 4MB of RAM exp. to 16MB
w/ 6450902, 6450128, or 6450130.

32G3283 55 PLANAR BOARD: As above for 55SX/LS.

32G4144 MDL70 PRCUPG 486DX33: i486DX33 for 16/20MHz Model 70's. Uses system
memory.

32G4148 MDL80 PRCUPG 486DX33: As above for 16/20MHz Model 80's.

32G3606 IBM 486SLC2 PROC UPG: 486SLC2 for 56SX, 56SLC, 57SX, 57SLC, and
M57SLC from 386SX, 386SLC, and 486SX.
20/40MHz.

70G8992 IBM 486DX2/66 PLANAR: 486DX2/66 Upgrade Planar Board for 60, 65, and
80. Int. Math Co-proc. 128MB max. on 8 SIMM
sockets. P24T upgradeable. Opt. L2 cache. ECC
memory. 70/80ns. SVGA 1024x768. IDE
controller.

32G3296 IBM 486BL2/66 PLANAR: 486BL2/66 Upgrade Planar Board for 60, 65, and
80. Same as above with no Math Co-proc.

70G8988 IBM 486DX33 PLANAR: 486DX33 Upgrade Planar for Model 70. Int. Math
Co-proc. 31MB addressable on 2 SIMM Sockets
(4/16MB), P24T. 70/80ns memory. SVGA
1024x768. IDE controller.

32G3300 IBM 486BL2/66 PLANAR: 486BL2/66 for Model 70. As above but no Math
Co-proc.

32G3335 60/65/80 HARDFILE KT: No description at FAQ time. ?Kit to mount hard
drive in Model 60, 65, and 80 systems with
planar upgrade?

32G3331 70 HARDFILE KIT: No description at FAQ time. ?Kit to mount hard
drive in Model 70 systems with planar upgrade?

STORAGE DEVICES AND ADPT

82G1778 53LS UPGRADE KIT: Allow 9553LS to support floppy/hard drive
installs.

6451042 CBL SCSI OPT/OPT EXT: 50pin SCSI to 50pin SCSI. 2 feet long.

32G2958 ENH CD-ROM II INT DR: Compact Drive Read Only Memory II Internal
Drive. Performs at max. data rate of 327kb/sec
and 205ms access speed.

32G2960 ENH CD-ROM II KIT C: Allows 32G2958 to be installed in a Model 90.

6451072 IBM 1.44 MB DSK DRV: 1.44 MB 1" high. Supports SCSI Models 65, 80,
90 and 95. Mod 30 when 1st drive indicator
is below media slot req. 6451034, 55LS req.
6451035, 55SX no add. req.

6451130 IBM 1.44MB DDR: 1.44 MB 1" high. 3.5" drive. Models 35LX,
35LS, 40SX and 57SX. LS req. 6451037.

6451037 IBM 1.44MB INST KT: Bezel and cable kit for 1.44MB DDR
installation into LS type machines.

6450353 IBM 1.44MB DDR 50-80: 1.44 MB 1" high. 3.5" drive. Model 30 uses
planar board if 1st drive indicator above
media slot, 50, 50Z, 60, 70, and 80. Model 30
req. 6451037. No 55SX or P70.

6451046 IBM 160MB HDR SCSI: 160 MB SCSI Fixed Disk Drive. 160MB formatted
internal drive with 32k buffer and 16ms access
time. Models 57SX, 60, 65, 80, 90, and 95.
Non-SCSI models req. 6451109 or 6451110, and
some may req. 6451053.

70G7164 IBM 1GB DR SERVER 95: 1GB Fixed Drive for Server 95. 36 month
warranty.

32G4198 IBM 1GB SCSI HDR: 1GB SCSI-2 Internal Hard Disk Drive. 8.7ms
access time. Supports 9590, 9595, 9556, 9557,
9576, 9577, 9585, 8590, 8595, 8556, 8557, and
8580.

32G4336 IBM 2.0GB SCSI HDR: 2GB SCSI Hard Drive.

6451121 IBM 2.3GB SCSI TDR: 2.3GB SCSI Internal Tape Drive. Use 21F8595
cart.

6451272 IBM 2.88MB DDR: 2.88MB 3.5" Disk Drive. Models 9556, 9557,
8556, 8557, 9576, and 9577. 720KB and 1.44KB
compatable.

6451271 IBM 2.88MB ENH DDR: Enhanced 2.88MB 3.5" Disk Drive. Models 9585,
9595, 8590 (0H5, 0H9, 0L9, 0LF) and 8595 (0H9,
0HF).

6451242 IBM 212MB HDR SCSI: 212MB Fixed Disk Drive. Int. in all PS/2 with
SCSI standard and ext. in all others with SCSI
CPUs.

32G4195 IBM 340MB AT HDR: 340MB AT Hard Drive. Models 8535xxx, 8540xxx.
Includes screws, slide and tray.

6451066 IBM 5.2 DDR/1,2 INT: 5.25" Internal 1.2MB Disk Drive. Models 35,
40, 57, 90, and 95. No slot req. 35LS req.
6451127.

62G4151 IBM 540MB SCSI HDR: 540MB SCSI-2 Internal Hard Disk Drive. 8.7ms
access. Models 9590, 9595, 9585, 9556, 9557,
9576, 9577, 8580, 8595, 8556, 8557, 8580.


30F5279 IBM 80/120MB INT TBU: Internal Tape Backup Unit 80MB/120MB. 3.5"
high. Models 35SX thru 95 (except 55SX/LS and
P70). Req. 87F9826 cable on SCSI models and
software.

6451109 IBM ADAPT SCSI: 16 bit SCSI Micro Channel Adapter for all
non-SCSI 16 bit systems. Replaces 6451005.

6451133 IBM ADAPT/CACHE SCSI: 32 bit SCSI Micro Channel Adapter with Cache
for all non-SCSI 32 bit systems. Replaces
6451110.

6451145 IBM CD-ROM II KIT A: Compact Read Only Memory II Drive Kit A. For
inst. of drive 6451104 in models 60, 65SX, 80
and 95 SCSI. Req. 6451133 or 6451109.

6451146 IBM CD-ROM II KIT B: Compact Read Only Memory II Drive Kit B. For
inst. of drive 6451104 and enclosure 35100V0
allows ext. installation in all PS/2s. Non-
SCSI req. 6451133 or 6451109.

6451126 IBM OPTICAL DR KIT A: Optical Drive Kit A. For install of drive
6450162 in models 60 and 80 (-041,-071,-111,
-311).

6451295 IBM R/W OPTICAL DR: 3.5" Enhanced Rewritable Optical Drive. All
SCSI PS/2 internally or external with
enclosure. 256KB buffer and 40ms seek time.

6451039 IBM SCSI EXT TERM: SCSI Terminator for use with 6451110. Inc.
with 6451139.

6451053 IBM SCSI HD KIT A: SCSI Hard Drive Kit A. Allows two SCSI fixed
disk drives to be installed in non-SCSI models
60, 80, and a 3rd and 4th drive in SCSI models
65 and 80. Converts one 5.25" full-high bay
into two 3.5" half-high.

6451120 IBM SCSI HDR KIT D: SCSI Hard Drive Kit D. For install of 60MB or
120MB SCSI fixed disk drive in model 57, 90,
95, or external enclosure 3511003.

92F3340 IBM TAPE BKUP KT OS2: Convenience kit for OS/2. Inc. program,
30F5279, and mini tape cart DC2120. SCSI
models req. cable 87F9826.

64G3736 TBU KIT 250 DOS: As above for DOS.

64G3713 TBU KIT 250 WINDOWS: As above for Windows.

MEMORY BOARDS

87F9856 IBM 2MB MEM OPT KIT: 32 bit Full size with 2MB memory, expands to
14MB. Models 70, 80, and P70. Accepts 6450603,
6450604, 6450608, and 87F9977 modules.

87F9860 IBM 4MB MEM OPT KIT: As above but with intially 4MB, expands to
14MB.

32G3720 IBM 16MB ECC MEM70NS: 16MB of 70ns ECC memory.

30F5360 IBM 2MB MEMRY 120NS: 2MB of 120ns memory for 25-286 and 30-286. Max
of 4 added to 1497259 and 6 added to 30F5362.
Existing 512K chips must be removed, AB4320
is the preferred solution.

6450902 IBM 2MB MEMRY 70NS: 2MB of 70ns memory.

6450608 IBM 2MB MEMRY 80NS: 2MB of 80ns memory.

6450604 IBM 2MB MEMRY 85NS: 2MB of 85ns memory. (Also 92F0104)

6450902 IBM 2MB MEMRY 70NS: 2MB of 70ns memory.

6450128 IBM 4MB MEMRY 70NS: 4MB of 70ns memory. (Also 92F0105)

87F9977 IBM 4MB MEMRY 80NS: 4MB of 80ns memory.

6451159 IBM 8MB MEM ECC70NS: 8MB of 70ns ECC memory.

6450130 IBM 8MB MEMRY 70NS: 8MB of 70ns memory.

MODEMS

82G7259 WINDSURFER ADPTR/A: Windsurfer communications adapter/A. with
integ. 14.4Kbps data modem, 9600bps FAX.
Telephone answering/voice mail. MIDI interface
capable. Supports Windows 3.1 MPC Audio Apps.
Soundblaster compatable.

60G0736 WAVERUNNER ADPTR/A: Digital FAX/Modem adapter/A. 64k bps over ISDN
Basic Rate ISDN (BRI) provides two B channels
of up to 64k bps voice/data and one D channel
for signaling info at 16kKbps; Bell 103, 212,
V.22bis, V.32, V.32bis compatible; packet
level bonding for IP packets; support for CAPI
and WinISDN APIs, 4:1 compression using V.42bis
over V.120 or ISDN via modem, 56k bps or 64k
bps with other ISDN devices; X.25 on B and D
channels when using CM/2 with OS/2; supports
Euro-ISDN, 1TR6, and VN4; G3 fax; includes
DataFAX Lite and TurboCom for Windows software
(3.5"). 10-foot phone cable; req's 386SX or
better processor in a PC capable of supporting
DMA bus master operation, OS/2 2.1 or MS
Windows 3.1; uses Mwave DSP for software
upgradeable functionality; 5 year warranty.

Please note these PART NUMBERS tend to change and if you have a IBM part
simular to what is listed here, but with a different IBMPN then call
800-772-2227 for a cross-reference. Also some options listed may work in
other machines, but are not called for per IBM, in general if it works it
works. I would recommend a comp.sys.ibm.ps2.hardware post though before
buying something expensive on speculation that your PS/2 is 'close enough'
to another for compatability (if you are buying used equipment, IBM PC
Direct offers 30-day unconditional money-back returns if purchased through
them).


Appendix B IBM Reference Disk Listing

[From: ftp.pc.ibm.com as of 10/30/98]

IBM PCC BBS
(919)-517-0001
======================================
Reference & Adapter Diskettes
/pub/pccbbs/refdisks
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
160mslct.exe 136456 03-06-91 PS/2 160MB SCSI fixed restoration dsk
25-286ad.exe 241630 08-04-95 PS/2 Model 25-286 Advanded Diags V 1.0
253540dg.exe 292630 10-18-93 PS/2 Adv Diag 25,35,40 disk ver 1.20
25start.tg0 289990 07-21-93 IBM PS/2 MOD 25 starter diskette v1.0
25sxstr.exe 293588 05-06-92 Adv Diag for 25, 35, 40 v1.3
30start.exe 311255 07-02-96 PS/2 model 30 starter disk
3540st.exe 293656 12-04-93 Models 35 & 40 starter disk ver. 1.03
3_3boot.exe 126208 08-24-95 DOS 3.3 Boot disk with maint. files
40sxdiag.tg0 282344 07-09-91 Advanced Diag v1.02 for 40SX
4xsnd22.zip 1316800 07-24-96 Sound Disk 2of2 for 4x Stereo PCMCIA CD
5-25boot.exe 151819 08-24-95 DOS 3.3 BOOT DISK W/ MAINT. FILES
5140star.exe 311787 07-14-94 5140 PCC Starter Disk w/APP Selector
55ls65rf.exe 461821 01-02-92 55ls & 65 Reference Diskette
56patch.exe 18038 10-18-94 56 LS patch for 169 errors.
70_flash.exe 71700 09-12-94 Mod 70 Planar Upgrade - BIOS v 1.18.02
7677_201.exe 1049563 07-15-94 76/77 I&S OS/2 2.0 Video Driver Disk 1
7677_202.exe 752888 07-15-94 76/77 I&S OS/2 2.0 Video Driver Disk 2
7677diag.exe 390712 10-18-95 G7GT55A 76/77 I&S Diagnostic disk v3.11
7677dosd.exe 727016 12-06-94 76/77 I&S DOS/Win S3 Graphics Disk v1.2
7677flsh.exe 225495 03-12-96 76/77 I&S Flash Update Disk Revision 7 G7GT59A

7677ref.exe 774689 10-19-95 76/77 I&S Reference Disk v3.10
7677scsi.exe 515335 07-02-96 Future Domain SCSI-2 Option Disk v1.00
7677wnet.exe 707331 10-20-94 76/77 S3 Windows drvrs for Novell Ntwks
953540st.exe 405829 03-01-94 9535/9540 Starter Disk version 1.00
adv25dia.exe 140884 04-18-91 PS/2 Model 25 Advanced Diag ver 1.00
adv30286.exe 193226 07-02-96 Advanced Diags for Mod-30 & Mod-25 286s
adv30dig.exe 142180 08-20-92 Advanced diag for Model/30 8086
atdg207.exe 148558 02-07-97 Adv Diag PC/AT & XT-286 v.2.07 360K
atdg207.tg0 131074 11-10-94 Adv Diags Disk PC/AT & XT-286 v.2.07
blc_util.exe 27438 01-27-95 70/80 Blue-Lightning proc u/g util disk
bopt103.exe 376224 03-26-93 enable all enhanced memory - see 5 line ...The

files contained allow users with AT LEAST ONE
Enhanced Memory Adapter with ROM installed to
enable all memory contained on all installed
Enhanced Memory Adapters. This included
systems that hBOPT103.LAB label for IBM label
prg.for BOPT103.EXE
bopt103.lab 996 03-25-93 label for IBM label prg.for BOPT103.EXE
bopt103.txt 397 03-25-93 Text file for BOPT103.EXE
disk02.sys 36893 02-17-94 76/77 I & S OS/2 1.3 Installation Fix
dspos212.zip 1010375 06-18-96 MWAVE for OS/2 Disk 1 of 2 for 25H2749
dspos222.zip 230364 06-18-96 MWAVE for OS/2 Disk 2 of 2 for 25H2749
dspwav16.zip 1212865 06-18-96 MWAVE for Win3.1x Disk 1of6 for 25H2749
dspwav26.zip 1339530 06-18-96 MWAVE for Win3.1x Disk 2of6 for 25H2749
dspwav36.zip 1335967 06-18-96 MWAVE for Win3.1x Disk 3of6 for 25H2749
dspwav46.zip 1272865 06-18-96 MWAVE for Win3.1x Disk 4of6 for 25H2749
dspwav56.zip 1339659 06-18-96 MWAVE for Win3.1x Disk 5of6 for 25H2749
dspwav66.zip 369270 06-18-96 MWAVE for Win3.1x Disk 6of6 for 25H2749
ether32a.exe 303949 03-30-93 32bit 3Connect Ether/A Opt Disk v1.00
g7jt60a.exe 225221 08-18-97 PS/2 - Model 76/77 Bios revision level 8 build

60A
g7jt61a.exe 225303 04-27-98 Flash BIOS Update diskette v61a 9576, 9577
interfac.exe 207422 04-11-94 Interface code for 8514/A 1.02
irlan.exe 473495 09-07-94 IR Lan version 2.10 replacement disk
kelrec.exe 840280 08-24-95 Kelso Recovery Diskette
m5060pu.exe 215084 02-25-94 50/60 Microelectronics PU opt. diskette
mod30286.exe 458650 07-02-96 Mod 30-286 Starter diskette v 1.02
n51ref.exe 616270 07-29-93 PS/2 model for N51 v1.10
opt3514.exe 369863 04-14-93 3514 Startable Option Diskette v1.15
opt4a.exe 351832 03-12-93 Option dsk for 4/A w/updted diag
os2dpmv.exe 130051 06-01-94 OS/2 Display Power Management Drivers
os2power.exe 184965 10-04-94 XGA Power mgnt. drivers for OS/2
p70-386r.exe 483171 04-22-94 P70-386 Reference disk
pageprtr.com 6709 04-02-93 Per Page Ptr Adp/A Opt Dsk V.1.10
pc_net.exe 115857 07-02-96 PC Network Diagnostics V.2.0
pccadv11.exe 102472 12-02-91 PC Convertible Advance Diag ver 1.11
powrscsi.exe 323562 07-02-96 Future Domain PowerSCSI Util Disk v1.00
powscsi4.exe 751872 03-24-97 Future Domain Power SCSI Util. Disk v4.1
ps1diag1.exe 151584 07-02-96 PS/1 Diagnostics Diskette
ps1diag2.exe 159556 09-17-92 PS/1 Type 2121 Advanced Diagnostics
ps1diag3.exe 293224 09-17-92 PS/1 Type 2123 Advanced Diagnostics
ps1diag4.exe 135247 10-20-92 PS/1 Type 1 2133/2155 Advanced Diags.
ps2estrt.exe 457749 04-11-95 9533E Starter Diskette v1.0
ps2eutil.exe 437208 04-23-96 9533E utilities disk version 1.0
ps2mouse.zip 9196 09-25-95 IBM PS/2 Mouse Program Diskette Ver 1.00
rd7677a.exe 335394 04-08-94 Adv Diags. for 9576/9577 Ver 1.10
rd855657.exe 308552 02-14-95 Diagnostic Disk for 8556/8557 v2.04
rd9553a.exe 324726 11-24-93 Diagnostics for 9553 v1.00
rd955657.exe 332850 07-02-96 Diagnostic Disk for 9556/9557 v2.04
rf5055pu.exe 641901 10-01-96 Mod 50/50z/55 System Board Upgrd RefDsk
rf5060a.exe 418375 07-01-96 PS2 50/50Z/60 ref disk, v 1.08
rf5565a.exe 461821 07-02-96 PS/2 Model 55/65 Ref Disk ver 1.05
rf70486a.exe 441168 04-23-92 PS/2 Model 70-486 Reference Disk v1.06
rf7080a.exe 450404 07-01-96 Model 8570/8580 Reference Disk ver 1.12
rf70plan.exe 632877 07-02-96 Model 70 Planar Ref DIsk
rf7677a.exe 647418 07-02-96 Ref. Diskette for Mod. 76 & 77 Ver 1.10
rf855657.exe 537776 07-02-96 Reference Disk for 8556/8557 v2.10
rf90386a.exe 515172 03-01-93 PS/2 MOD 90XP/386 ref diskette
rf9553a.exe 529771 11-25-93 Reference disk for 9553 V1.10
rf955657.exe 579652 07-02-96 Reference Disk for 9556/9557 v1.10
rfp70a.exe 483171 04-24-92 Ref Disk for a P70
rfp75a.exe 525532 07-02-96 PS/2 Mod P75 486 Ref. Disk - ver 1.00
rs25286a.tg0 500048 08-18-93 PS/2 Model 25-286 Starter disk - V1.00
s3-cid.cmd 29284 03-07-95 CMD file for LAcuna (S3928) CID Install
trbm.exe 314282 10-30-92 Token-Ring 16/4/A Busmaster Ref v. 1.02
utte131.exe 897512 11-15-94 PCMCIA Device Drivers for 9533
vpadv100.exe 144419 12-22-92 PS/VP Adv Diags-Mach Type 6384, V1.00
...PS/ValuePoint Advanced Diagnostics -
Machine Type 6384, Ver 1.00 For IBM Dealers
and support personnel only. Not provided with
ValuePoint machine shipments. (C)IBM Corp.
1981, 1992
wavdos12.zip 405704 06-18-96 MWAVE for DOS Disk 1 of 2 for 25H2749
wavdos22.zip 473273 06-18-96 MWAVE for DOS Disk 2 of 2 for 25H2749
wavos211.zip 193208 06-18-96 MWAVE for OS/2 v2.11 Disk 1of1 25H2749
wavwarp1.zip 127369 06-18-96 MWAVE for Warp Disk 1 of 1 for 25H2749
win30drv.exe 368198 05-07-93 XGA-2 drivers for Windows 3.0
winpower.exe 220234 10-13-95 DOS/ Windows 3.x DPMS drivers
xga210.exe 883754 11-15-93 XGA-2 Drivers Win 3.1 & Vesa v2.10
xga211.exe 877913 12-28-93 XGA/XGA2 DOS,WIN,ACAD, VESA DMQS v2.11
xga212.exe 960857 08-16-94 XGA/XGA2 Drv v2.12 DMQS/DOS/WIN311
xga2adp.exe 493919 04-22-94 Option Disk for XGA-2 Adapter v2.2
xgadoc.txt 118900 01-07-94 XGA/XGA-2 tech support supplemental
xgaopt.exe 493919 08-05-93 XGA/XGA2 Display Adapter Options Disk
xgapatch.com 28185 04-06-95 XGA Patch files for 9533 Starter Disk
xgautil.exe 67714 08-09-94 XGA/XGA2 Utilities (P70.EXE & P75.EXE)
xtdgs225.dsk 126350 07-01-91 Advanced Diags, PC, XT, & PPC ver 2.25


======================================

Quick Scan to Verify if you have latest version.

Disk Current Version
Model 25
Model 25-286
Model 30
Model 30-286
Model 35 1.21
Model 40 1.21
Model 50/60 1.08
Model 53
Model 55/65 1.??
Model 56/57 1.10
Model 65
Model 70/80 386 1.12
Model P70 386 1.??
Model 70 486 1.06
Model P75 486 1.??
Model 76/77 1.10
Model 85 1.10
Model 90-0Gx/0Jx/0Kx 1.31
Model 90-0Hx 1.??
Model 95-0Gx/0Jx/0Kx 1.31

Also a call to IBM 1-800-772-2227 will help, and it won't hurt to take a guess
as it will tell you if you have the wrong reference disk.


Appendix C .ADF Modification to run SB and Audiovation/A together.

[Note this is untested by FAQ author, also I would like the patch to keep
the joystick port on the Audiovation too so the reader can decide which he
would like to do.]

AdapterId 08FD6h

AdapterName "IBM Audiovation Adapter"

NumBytes 4

FixedResources
;To enable PS/1 MIDI mode change pos[0]=XX00X0XX to pos[0]=XX00XXXX and
;uncomment the lines related to MIDI at the end of this file
pos[0]=XX00X0XXb
pos[1]=0000XXXXb
pos[3]=11XXXXXXb

Begin NoDMA
NamedItem Prompt "I/O Address Selection"
choice "0400-041F 04F8-04FF" pos[3]=XX000001b io 0400h-041fh 04f8h-04ffh
choice "0800-081F 08F8-08FF" pos[3]=XX000010b io 0800h-081fh 08f8h-08ffh
choice "0C00-0C1F 0CF8-0CFF" pos[3]=XX000011b io 0c00h-0c1fh 0cf8h-0cffh
choice "1000-101F 10F8-10FF" pos[3]=XX000100b io 1000h-101fh 10f8h-10ffh
choice "1400-141F 14F8-14FF" pos[3]=XX000101b io 1400h-141fh 14f8h-14ffh
choice "1800-181F 18F8-18FF" pos[3]=XX000110b io 1800h-181fh 18f8h-18ffh
choice "1C00-1C1F 1CF8-1CFF" pos[3]=XX000111b io 1c00h-1c1fh 1cf8h-1cffh
choice "2000-201F 20F8-20FF" pos[3]=XX001000b io 2000h-201fh 20f8h-20ffh
choice "2400-241F 24F8-24FF" pos[3]=XX001001b io 2400h-241fh 24f8h-24ffh
choice "2800-281F 28F8-28FF" pos[3]=XX001010b io 2800h-281fh 28f8h-28ffh
choice "2C00-2C1F 2CF8-2CFF" pos[3]=XX001011b io 2c00h-2c1fh 2cf8h-2cffh
choice "3000-301F 30F8-30FF" pos[3]=XX001100b io 3000h-301fh 30f8h-30ffh
choice "3400-341F 34F8-34FF" pos[3]=XX001101b io 3400h-341fh 34f8h-34ffh
choice "3800-381F 38F8-38FF" pos[3]=XX001110b io 3800h-381fh 38f8h-38ffh
choice "3C00-3C1F 3CF8-3CFF" pos[3]=XX001111b io 3c00h-3c1fh 3cf8h-3cffh
choice "4000-401F 40F8-40FF" pos[3]=XX010000b io 4000h-401fh 40f8h-40ffh
choice "4400-441F 44F8-44FF" pos[3]=XX010001b io 4400h-441fh 44f8h-44ffh
choice "4800-481F 48F8-48FF" pos[3]=XX010010b io 4800h-481fh 48f8h-48ffh
choice "4C00-4C1F 4CF8-4CFF" pos[3]=XX010011b io 4c00h-4c1fh 4cf8h-4cffh

Help
"This item enables the selection of I/O addresses that are used by the
adapter. Conflicting I/O addresses are marked with an asterisk and
should be changed. Use the F5=Previous and the F6=Next keys to change
conflicting addresses in the 'Change Configuration' window."

NamedItem Prompt "Arbitration Level"
choice "Level 8" pos[1]=XXXX1000b arb 08h
choice "Level 9" pos[1]=XXXX1001b arb 09h
choice "Level A" pos[1]=XXXX1010b arb 0ah
choice "Level B" pos[1]=XXXX1011b arb 0bh
choice "Level C" pos[1]=XXXX1100b arb 0ch
choice "Level D" pos[1]=XXXX1101b arb 0dh
choice "Level E" pos[1]=XXXX1110b arb 0eh
choice "Level 1" pos[1]=XXXX0001b arb 01h
choice "Level 3" pos[1]=XXXX0011b arb 03h
choice "Level 5" pos[1]=XXXX0101b arb 05h
choice "Level 6" pos[1]=XXXX0110b arb 06h
choice "Level 7" pos[1]=XXXX0111b arb 07h

Help
"This item enables the selection of available MicroChannel Arbitration
levels. Conflicting levels are marked with an asterisk and should be
changed. Use the F5=Previous and the F6=Next keys to change conflicting
levels in the 'Change Configuration' window."

NamedItem Prompt "Fairness Enable/Disable"
choice "Disabled" pos[0]=0XXXXXXXb
choice "Enabled" pos[0]=1XXXXXXXb

Help
"This item enables the MicroChannel Fairness feature to be enabled or
disabled. The recommended setting is disabled."

;To enable PS/1 MIDI mode - uncomment the following lines and re-configure
; NamedItem Prompt "MIDI Port Enable/Disable"
; choice "Enabled" pos[0]=XXXXX1XXb io 0330h-0335h int 7
; choice "Disabled" pos[0]=XXXXX0XXb
;
; Help
; "MIDI may be enabled or disabled by the user. If an MPU adapter is also
; installed in the same system using Primary addresses, set this item to
; 'Disabled' or use the Alternate addresses for the MPU."

NamedItem Prompt "DSP Interrupt Selection"
choice "Interrupt Level 15 decimal" pos[0]=XXXXXXXXb int 15

Help
"The Digital Signal Processor Interrupt level is
set at 15. It cannot be configured."

End


Appendix D POST Code Listing


Compiled from IBM Technical Reference, and IBM Hardware,
Maintenance and Service Manuals.

Code Descriptions
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
01x Undetermined problem errors

02x Power supply errors

1xx System Board Errors
101 System Board Error; Interrupt failure
102 System Board Error; Timer failure
103 System Board Error; Timer Interrupt failure
104 System Board Error; Protected mode failure
105 System Board Error; Last 8042 command not accepted
106 System Board Error; Converting logic test
107 System Board Error; Hot Non Maskable Interrupt test
108 System Board Error; Timer bus test
109 System Board Error; Memory select error
110 PS/2 System Board Error; Parity check error
111 PS/2 Memory adaptor error
112 PS/2 MicroChannel arbitration error
113 PS/2 MicroChannel arbitration error
114 PS/2 External ROM checksum Error (common to 2-8MB Memory card)
121 Unexpected hardware interrupts occured
131 PC system board cassette port wrap test failure
161 System Options Not Set-(Run SETUP); Dead battery
162 System Options Not Set-(Run SETUP); CMOS checksum/configuration error
163 Time & Date Not Set-(Run SETUP); Clock not updating
164 Memory Size Error-(Run SETUP); CMOS setting does not match memory
165 PS/2 System options not set
166 PS/2 MicroChannel adapter time-out error
199 User indicated INSTALLED DEVICES list is not correct

2xx Memory (RAM) errors
201 Memory test failure, error location will be displayed in hexadecimal
202 Memory address error, address lines 00-15
203 Memory address error, address lines 16-23
215 PS/2 Motherboard memory failure
216 PS/2 Motherboard memory failure

3xx Keyboard errors
301 Keyboard did not respond to software reset or a stuck key failure
was detected. If a stuck key was detected, the scan code for the
key is displayed in hexadecimal.
302 System Unit Keylock is Locked
303 Keyboard or System Unit Error
304 Keyboard or System Unit Error; Keyboard clock high
305 PS/2 Keyboard fuse (on system board) error

4xx Monochrome Display Adapter (MDA) errors
4xx PS/2 System board parallel port errors
401 Monochrome memory test, horizontal sync frequency test, or video
test failure
401 PS/2 System board parallel port failure
408 User indicated display attributes failure
416 User indicated character set failure
424 User indicated 80x25 mode failure
432 Parallel port test failure; monochrome display adapter

5xx Color Graphics Adapter (CGA) errors
501 CGA memory test, horizontal sync frequency test, or video test
failure
508 User indicated display attribute failure
516 User indicated character set failure
524 User indicated 80x25 mode failure
532 User indicated 40x25 mode failure
540 User indicated 320x200 graphics mode failure
548 User indicated 640x200 graphics mode failure

6xx Floppy drive/adapter errors
601 Floppy drive/adapter Power On Self Test failure
602 Drive test failure; disk boot record not valid
606 Drive changeline function failure; drive error
607 Disk is write protected; drive error
608 Bad command; drive error
610 Disk initialization failure; track 0 bad
611 Time-out; drive error
612 Bad Controller chip
613 Bad Direct Memory Access; drive error
614 Bad Direct Memory Access; boundary overrun
615 Bad index timing; drive error
616 Drive speed error
621 Bad seek; drive error
622 Bad Cyclic Redundancy Check; drive error
623 Record not found; drive error
624 Bad address mark; drive error
625 Bad Controller chip; seek error
626 Disk data compare error

7xx 8087, 80287 or 80387 math coprocessor errors

9xx Parallel printer adapter errors
901 Parallel printer adapter test failure

10xx Alternate parallel printer adapter errors
1001 Alternate parallel printer adapter test failure

11xx Asynchronous communications adapter errors
11xx PS/2 System board async port errors
1101 Asynchronous communications adapter test failure
1102 PS/2 System board async port or serial device error
1106 PS/2 System board async port or serial device error
1107 PS/2 System board async port or serial cable error
1108 PS/2 System board async port or serial device error
1109 PS/2 System board async port or serial device error
1112 PS/2 System board async port error
1118 PS/2 System board async port error
1119 PS/2 System board async port error

12xx Alternate asynchronous communications adapter errors
12xx PS/2 Dual async adapter error
1201 Alternate asynchronous communications adapter test failure
1202 PS/2 Dual async adapter or serial device error
1206
1207 PS/2 Dual async adapter or serial cable error
1208 PS/2 Dual async adapter or serial device error
1209
1212 PS/2 Dual async adapter or system board error
1218
1219
1227
1233
1234

13xx Game control adapter errors
1301 Game control adapter test failure
1301 Joy-stick test failure

14xx Matrix Printer errors

15xx Synchronous data link control (SDLC) communications adapter errors
1510 8255 port B failure
1511 8255 port A failure
1512 8255 port C failure
1513 8253 timer 1 did not reach terminal count
1514 8253 timer 1 stuck on
1515 8253 timer 0 did not reach terminal count
1516 8253 timer 0 stuck on
1517 8253 timer 2 did not reach terminal count
1518 8253 timer 2 stuck on
1519 8273 port B error
1520 8273 port A error
1521 8273 command/read time-out
1522 Interrupt level 4 failure
1523 Ring Indicate stuck on
1524 Receive clock stuck on
1525 Transmit clock stuck on
1526 Test indicate stuck on
1527 Ring indicate not on
1528 Receive clock not on
1529 Transmit clock not on
1530 Test indicate not on
1531 Data set ready not on
1532 Carrier detect not on
1533 Clear to send not on
1534 Data set ready stuck on
1536 Clear to send stuck on
1537 Level 3 interrupt failure
1538 Receive interrupt results error
1539 Wrap data compare error
1540 Direct Memory Access channel 1 error
1541 Direct Memory Access channel 1 error
1542 Error in 8273 error checking or status reporting
1547 Stray interrupt level 4
1548 Stray interrupt level 3
1549 Interrupt presentation sequence time-out

16xx Display emulation errors (327x, 5520, 525x)

17xx Fixed disk errors
1701 Fixed disk POST error
1702 Fixed disk adapter error
1703 Fixed disk drive error
1704 Fixed disk adapter or drive error
1780 Fixed disk 0 failure
1781 Fixed disk 1 failure
1782 Fixed disk controller failure
1790 Fixed disk 0 error
1791 Fixed disk 1 error

18xx I/O expansion unit errors
1801 I/O expansion unit POST error
1810 Enable/Disable failure
1811 Extender card wrap test failure; disabled
1812 High order address lines failure; disabled
1813 Wait state failure; disabled
1814 Enable/Disable could not be set on
1815 Wait state failure; disabled
1816 Extender card wrap test failure; enabled
1817 High order address lines failure; enabled
1818 Disable not functioning
1819 Wait request switch not set correctly
1820 Receiver card wrap test failure
1821 Receiver high order address lines failure

19xx 3270 PC attachment card errors

20xx Binary synchronous (BSC) adapter errors
2010 8255 port A failure
2011 8255 port B failure
2012 8255 port C failure
2013 8253 timer 1 did not reach terminal count
2014 8253 timer 1 stuck on
2015 8253 timer 2 did not reach terminal count or timer 2 stuck on
2017 8251 Data set ready failed to come on
2018 8251 Clear to send not sensed
2019 8251 Data set ready stuck on
2020 8251 Clear to send stuck on
2021 8251 hardware reset failure
2022 8251 software reset failure
2023 8251 software "error reset" failure
2024 8251 transmit ready did not come on
2025 8251 receive ready did not come on
2026 8251 could not force "overrun" error status
2027 Interrupt failure; no timer interrupt
2028 Interrupt failure; transmit, replace card or planar
2029 Interrupt failure; transmit, replace card
2030 Interrupt failure; receive, replace card or planar
2031 Interrupt failure; receive, replace card
2033 Ring indicate stuck on
2034 Receive clock stuck on
2035 Transmit clock stuck on
2036 Test indicate stuck on
2037 Ring indicate stuck on
2038 Receive clock not on
2039 Transmit clock not on
2040 Test indicate not on
2041 Data set ready not on
2042 Carrier detect not on
2043 Clear to send not on
2044 Data set ready stuck on
2045 Carrier detect stuck on
2046 Clear to send stuck on
2047 Unexpected transmit interrupt
2048 Unexpected receive interrupt
2049 Transmit data did not equal receive data
2050 8251 detected overrun error
2051 Lost data set ready during data wrap
2052 Receive time-out during data wrap

21xx Alternate binary synchronous communications adapter errors
2110 8255 port A failure
2111 8255 port B failure
2112 8255 port C failure
2113 8253 timer 1 did not reach terminal count
2114 8253 timer 1 stuck on
2115 8253 timer 2 did not reach terminal count or timer 2 stuck on.
2117 8251 Data set ready failed to come on
2118 8251 Clear to send not sensed
2119 8251 Data set ready stuck on
2120 8251 Clear to send stuck on
2121 8251 hardware reset failure
2122 8251 software reset failure
2123 8251 software "error reset" failure
2124 8251 transmit ready did not come on
2125 8251 receive ready did not come on
2126 8251 could not force "overrun" error status
2127 Interrupt failure; no timer interrupt
2128 Interrupt failure; transmit, replace card or planar
2129 Interrupt failure; transmit, replace card
2130 Interrupt failure; receive, replace card or planar
2131 Interrupt failure; receive, replace card
2133 Ring indicate stuck on
2134 Receive clock stuck on
2135 Transmit clock stuck on
2136 Test indicate stuck on
2137 Ring indicate stuck on
2138 Receive clock not on
2139 Transmit clock not on
2140 Test indicate not on
2141 Data set ready not on
2142 Carrier detect not on
2143 Clear to send not on
2144 Data set ready stuck on
2145 Carrier detect stuck on
2146 Clear to send stuck on
2147 Unexpected transmit interrupt
2148 Unexpected receive interrupt
2149 Transmit Data did not equal receive data
2150 8251 detected overrun error
2151 Lost data set ready during data wrap
2152 Receive time-out during data wrap

22xx Cluster adapter errors

24xx Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA) errors
24xx PS/2 System board Video Graphics Array (VGA) errors
2401 PS/2 Video Cable error (tbarnum@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu)

26xx XT/370 errors

27xx AT/370 errors

28xx 3278/79 emulation adapter errors

29xx Color/graphics printer errors

30xx Primary PC Network adapter error
3001 Processor test failure
3002 ROM checksum test failure
3003 Unit ID PROM test failure
3004 RAM test failure
3005 Host Interface Controller test failure
3006 +/- 12v test failure
3007 Digital loopback test failure
3008 Host detected Host Interface Controller failure
3009 Sync failure and no Go bit
3010 Host Interface Controller test OK and no Go bit
3011 Go bit and no Command 41
3012 Card not present
3013 Digital failure; fall through
3015 Analog failure
3041 Hot carrier; not this card
3042 Hot carrier; this card!

31xx Secondary PC Network adapter errors
3101 Processor test failure
3102 ROM check test failure
3103 Unit ID PROM test failure
3104 RAM test failure
3105 Host Interface Controller test failure
3106 +/- 12v test failure
3107 Digital loopback test failure
3108 Host detected Host Interface Controller failure
3109 Sync failure and no Go bit
3110 Host Interface Controller test OK and no Go bit
3111 Go bit and no Command 41
3112 Card not present
3113 Digital failure; fall through
3115 Analog failure
3141 Hot carrier; not this card
3142 Hot carrier; this card!

33xx Compact printer errors

36xx General Purpose Interface Bus (GPIB) adapter errors

38xx Data acquisition adapter errors

39xx Professional graphics controller errors

71xx Voice communications adapter errors

73xx 3.5" external diskette drive errors
7306 Disk changeline function failure; track 0 bad
7307 Disk is write protected; drive error
7308 Bad command; drive error
7310 Disk initialization failure; track 0 bad
7311 Time-out; drive error
7312 Bad Controller chip
7313 Bad Direct Memory Access; drive error
7314 Bad Direct Memory Access; boundary overrun
7315 Bad index timing; drive error
7316 Drive speed error
7321 Bad seek; drive error
7322 Bad Cyclic Redundancy Check; drive error
7323 Record not found; drive error
7324 Bad address mark; drive error
7325 Bad Controller chip; seek error

74xx IBM PS/2 Display adapter (VGA card) errors

85xx IBM Expanded Memory Adapter (XMA) errors

86xx PS/2 Pointing device errors
8601 PS/2 Pointing device error
8602 PS/2 Pointing device error
8603 PS/2 Pointing device error or System board failure

89xx Music feature card errors

9670 SCSI adapter error

100xx PS/2 Multiprotocol adapter errors
10002 PS/2 Multiprotocol adapter or serial device error
10006 PS/2 Multiprotocol adapter or serial device error
10007 PS/2 Multiprotocol adapter or communications cable error
10008 PS/2 Multiprotocol adapter or serial device error
10009 PS/2 Multiprotocol adapter or serial device error
10012 PS/2 Multiprotocol adapter or system board error.
10018
10019
10042
10056

104xx PS/2 ESDI Fixed disk errors
10480 PS/2 ESDI Fixed disk 0 failure
10481 PS/2 ESDI Fixed disk 1 failure
10482 PS/2 ESDI Fixed disk controller failure
10483 PS/2 ESDI Fixed disk controller failure
10490 PS/2 ESDI Fixed disk 0 error
10491 PS/2 ESDI Fixed disk 1 error

21060 SCSI device error, Device not recognized

I99920 IML error
In reference diagnoses these numbers are reported as eight digit numbers. A
VGA error at post might be 2410 but in the reference disk it is reported as
00241000.


Appendix E Pinouts


6pin DIN Male DB15-S Male
--+-- ----------------------
/ 6+5 \ \ 1 2 3 4 5 /
| 4 3 | \ 6 7 8 9 10 /
\ 1 2 / \ 11 12 13 14 15 /
----- ----------------


DB9 (DE-9) Male DB15 (DA-15) Male
------------- --------------------------
\ 1 2 3 4 5 / \ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 /
\ 6 7 8 9 / \ 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 /
--------- ----------------------

DB25 Male IDC-50 Male
------------------------------ -------------------
\ 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 ... 13 / | 1 3 5 7 ... 49 |
\ 14 15 16 17 18 .......25 / | 2 4 6 8 ... 50 |
-------------------------- -------------------

(Power Connector) Male
__________
/ \
| 4 3 2 1 |
------------



*Motherboard Power Connectors *NEED ASCII OF BOARD POWER CONNECTOR

30 pin SIMM 72 pin SIMM
------------------------------- ---------------------------------------
| | | |
) | ) _ |
--|||||||||||||||||||||||||--- --|||||||||||||||/ \|||||||||||||||---
1 30 1 36 37 72



MIDI 5pin DIN
MIDI In MIDI Out
pin assignment pin assignment
1 N/C 1 N/C
2 N/C 2 GND
3 N/C 3 N/C
4 Current Src 4 Current Sync
5 Current Sync 5 Current Src

Power Connector Male
pin assignment
1 +12V
2 +12V return
3 +5V return
4 +5V

PS/2 Keyboard Connector 5pin-DIN
pin assignment
1 +KBD data
2 Reserved
3 Ground
4 +5 Vdc
5 +KBD clk
6 Reserved
Shield Frame ground

PS/2 Mouse/6pin DIN
[Thanks to Ian Wilson ]
pin assignment
1 Data
2 Not Connected
3 Signal Ground
4 +5 VDC
5 CLock
6 Not Connected
Shield Frame ground


Game Port DB15-Female
pin assignment pin assignment
1 +5V DC 2 Button 4 (A_PB1)
3 Position 0(A_X) 4 GND
5 GND 6 Position 1 (A_Y)
7 Button 5(A_PB2) 8 +5V DC
9 +5V DC 10 Button 6 (B_PB1)
11 Position 2(B_X) 12 GND
13 Position 3(B_Y) 14 Button 7 (B_PB2)
15 +5V DC


Serial Port DB9-Male DB25-Male
9-pin 25-pin assignment
1 8 DCD (Data Carrier Detect)
2 3 RX (Receive Data)
3 2 TX (Transmit Data)
4 20 DTR (Data Terminal Ready)
5 7 GND (Signal Ground)
6 6 DSR (Data Set Ready)
7 4 RTS (Request To Send)
8 5 CTS (Clear To Send)
9 22 RI (Ring Indicator)


Parallel Port DB25-Female
pin assignment pin assignment
1 -Strobe 2 Data 0
3 Data 1 4 Data 2
5 Data 3 6 Data 4
7 Data 5 8 Data 6
9 Data 7 10 -Ack
11 Busy 12 Paper Empty
13 Select 14 -Auto Feed
15 -Error 16 -Init
17 -Slct in 18 GND
19 GND 20 GND
21 GND 22 GND
23 GND 24 GND
25 GND


Parallel Port Centronics-36
1 -Strobe 2 Data 0
3 Data 1 4 Data 2
5 Data 3 6 Data 4
7 Data 5 8 Data 6
9 Data 7 10 -Ack
11 Busy 12 Paper Empty
13 Select 14 -Auto Feed
15 {OSCXT} 16 Signal GND
17 Frame GND 18 +5v
19 GND 20 GND
21 GND 22 GND
23 GND 24 GND
25 GND 26 GND
27 GND 28 GND
29 GND 30 GND
31 -Prime 32 -Error
33 Signal GND 34 N/C
35 N/C 36 N/C


MCA IDE Hard Disk Interface
pin assignment pin assignment
A1 -CD SETUP B1 Address Bit 15
A2 Address Bit 13 B2 Address Bit 14
A3 GROUND B3 GROUND
A4 Address Bit 11 B4 OSC (14.3 MHz)
A5 Address Bit 10 B5 GROUND
A6 Address Bit 9 B6 Address Bit 12
A7 +5 VDC B7 -CMD
A8 Address Bit 8 B8 -CD SFDBK
A9 Address Bit 7 B9 GROUND
A10 Address Bit 6 B10 Data Bit 1
A11 +5 VDC B11 Data Bit 3
A12 Address Bit 5 B12 Data Bit 4
A13 Address Bit 4 B13 GROUND
A14 Address Bit 3 B14 CHRESET
A15 +5 VDC B15 Data Bit 8
A16 Address Bit 2 B16 Data Bit 9
A17 Address Bit 1 B17 GROUND
A18 Address Bit 0 B18 Data Bit 12
A19 +12 VDC B19 Data Bit 14
A20 -ADL B20 Data Bit 15
A21 -PREEMPT B21 GROUND
A22 -BURST B22 Data Bit 0
A23 +5 VDC B23 Data Bit 2
A24 ARB 0 B24 Data Bit 5
A25 ARB 1 B25 GROUND
A26 ARB 2 B26 Data Bit 6
A27 +12 VDC B27 Data Bit 7
A28 ARB 3 B28 Data Bit 10
A29 +ARB/-GRANT B29 GROUND
A30 -TC B30 Data Bit 11
A31 +5 VDC B31 Data Bit 13
A32 -S0 B32 -SBHE
A33 -S1 B33 GROUND
A34 +M/-O B34 -CD DS 16
A35 GROUND B35 -IRQ 14
A36 CD CHRDY B36 GROUND

IDE Hard Disk Interface for Model 25/30
pin assignment pin assignment
1 -RESET 2 -Disk Installed
3 Data Bit 0 4 GROUND
5 Data Bit 1 6 GROUND
7 Data Bit 2 8 GROUND
9 Data Bit 3 10 GROUND
11 Data Bit 4 12 GROUND
13 Data Bit 5 14 GROUND
15 Data Bit 6 16 GROUND
17 Data Bit 7 18 GROUND
19 -IOR 20 GROUND
21 -IOW 22 GROUND
23 -CS1FX 24 GROUND
25 Address Bit 0 26 GROUND
27 Address Bit 1 28 GROUND
29 Address Bit 2 30 +5 VDC
31 RESERVED 32 +5 VDC
33 -DACK 3 34 GROUND
35 DRQ 3 36 GROUND
37 IRQ 5 38 GROUND
39 I/O CH RDY 40 +12 VDC
41 Spare 42 +12 VDC
43 Spare 44 +12 VDC


ESDI Hard Disk Interface
ESDI IDC-34
pin assignment pin assignment
1 GROUND 2 -HD SLCT 3
3 GROUND 4 -HD SLCT 2
5 GROUND 6 -WRITE GATE
7 GROUND 8 -CNFG/STATUS
9 GROUND 10 -XFER ACK
11 GROUND 12 -ATTENTION
13 GROUND 14 -HD SLCT 0
15 KEY (no pin) 16 -SECTOR
17 GROUND 18 -HD SLCT 1
19 GROUND 20 -INDEX
21 GROUND 22 -READY
23 GROUND 24 -XFER REQ
25 GROUND 26 -DRV SLCT 0
27 GROUND 28 -DRV SLCT 1
29 GROUND 30 Reserved
31 GROUND 32 -READ GATE
33 GROUND 34 -CMD DATA

ESDI IDC-20
pin assignment pin assignment
1 -DRV SLCTD 2 -SECTOR
3 -CMD COMPL 4 -ADDR MK EN
5 -GROUND 6 GROUND
7 +WRITE CLK 8 -WRITE CLK
9 GROUND 10 +RD/REF CLK
11 -RD/REF CLK 12 GROUND
13 +NRZ WRITE 14 -NRZ WRITE
15 GROUND 16 GROUND
17 +NRZ READ 18 -NRZ READ
19 GROUND 20 -INDEX


ST506/412 Hard Disk Interface
ST-506/412 34 pin connector
pin assignment pin assignment
1 GROUND 2 -HD SLCT 3
3 GROUND 4 -HD SLCT 2
5 GROUND 6 -WRITE GATE
7 GROUND 8 -SEEK CMPLT
9 GROUND 10 -TRACK 0
11 GROUND 12 -WRITE FAULT
13 GROUND 14 -HD SLCT 0
15 KEY (no pin) 16 Not Connected
17 GROUND 18 -HD SLCT 1
19 GROUND 20 -INDEX
21 GROUND 22 -READY
23 GROUND 24 -STEP
25 GROUND 26 -DRV SLCT 0
27 GROUND 28 -DRV SLCT 1
29 GROUND 30 Not Connected
31 GROUND 32 Not Connected
33 GROUND 34 -DIRECTION IN

ST-506/412 20 pin connector
pin assignment pin assignment
1 -DRV SLCTD 2 GROUND
3 Not Connected 4 GROUND
5 Not Connected 6 GROUND
7 Not Connected 8 Key (no pin)
9 Not Connected 10 Not Connected
11 GROUND 12 GROUND
13 +MFM WRITE 14 -MFM WRITE
15 GROUND 16 GROUND
17 +MFM READ 18 -MFM READ
19 GROUND 20 -INDEX


VGA DB15-S Female DB9 Female
15-pin 9-pin assignment
1 1 Red
2 2 Green
3 3 Blue
4 - Monitor ID bit 2
5 - N/C
6 6 GND (red return)
7 7 GND (green return)
8 8 GND (blue return)
9 - N/C
10 - GND
11 - Monitor ID bit 0
12 - Minitor ID bit 1
13 4 Horizontal Sync
14 5 Vertical Sync
15 - N/C

Monitor ID bit 0: reserved
Monitor ID bit 1: GND = mono, OPEN = color
Monochrome monitors use the green signal


CGA DB9 Female
pin assignment
1 GND
2 GND
3 Red
4 Green
5 Blue
6 Intensity
7 (reserved)
8 Horizontal Sync
9 Vertical Sync


EGA DB9 Female
pin assignment
1 GND
2 Secondary Red
3 Primary Red
4 Primary Green
5 Primary Blue
6 Secondary Green / Intensity
7 Secondary Blue / Mono Video
8 Horizontal Drive
9 Vertical Drive


Null Modem:
Connector 1 to Connector 2
DTR DSR/DCD
DSR/DCD DTR
RTS CTS
CTS RTS
TXD RXD
RXD TXD
GND GND


30 pin Fast Page Mode SIMM 256kx8 256kx9 1Mx8 1Mx9 4Mx8 4Mx9
pin assignment|pin assignment|pin assignment|pin assignment
1 Vcc |9 Gnd |17 A8 |25 DQ7
2 -CAS |10 DQ2 |18 A9 |26 QP
3 DQ0 |11 A4 |19 A10 |27 -RAS
4 A0 |12 A5 |20 DQ5 |28 -CASP
5 A1 |13 DQ3 |21 -WE |29 DP
6 DQ1 |14 A6 |22 Gnd |30 Vcc
7 A2 |15 A7 |23 DQ6
8 A3 |16 DQ4 |24 N/C

Notes:
QP, CASP and DP are N/C on all x8 bit modules
a9 is a N/C on 256k modules
a10 is a N/C on 256k and 1M modules


72 pin Fast Page Mode SIMM 256k/512k/1M/2M/4M/8M x 32/36 bit
pin assignment|pin assignment|pin assignment|pin assignment
1 Gnd |19 A10 |37 MP1 |55 DQ11
2 DQ0 |20 DQ4 |38 MP3 |56 DQ27
3 DQ16 |21 DQ20 |39 Gnd |57 DQ12
4 DQ1 |22 DQ5 |40 -CAS0 |58 DQ28
5 DQ17 |23 DQ21 |41 -CAS2 |59 Vcc
6 DQ2 |24 DQ6 |42 -CAS3 |60 DQ29
7 DQ18 |25 DQ22 |43 -CAS1 |61 DQ13
8 DQ3 |26 DQ7 |44 -RAS0 |62 DQ30
9 DQ19 |27 DQ23 |45 -RAS1 |63 DQ14
10 Vcc |28 A7 |46 N/C |64 DQ31
11 N/C |29 N/C |47 -WE |65 DQ15
12 A0 |30 Vcc |48 N/C |66 N/C
13 A1 |31 A8 |49 DQ8 |67 PD1
14 A2 |32 A9 |50 DQ24 |68 PD2
15 A3 |33 -RAS3 |51 DQ9 |69 PD3
16 A4 |34 -RAS2 |52 DQ25 |70 PD4
17 A5 |35 MP2 |53 DQ10 |71 N/C
18 A6 |36 MP0 |54 DQ26 |72 Gnd

Notes:
MP0,MP1,MP2,MP3 are N/C on all x32 bit modules
a9 is a N/C on 256k and 512k modules
a10 is a N/C on 256k, 512k, 1M and 4M modules
RAS1/RAS3 are N/C on 256k, 1M and 4M modules


*PS/2 72 pin SIMM

SCSI Connector Pinouts (Single Ended)

======================================

Pin Signal Pin Signal
----------------------------------------------------
1 Ground 31 Ground
2 Data 0 32 -Attention
3 Ground 33 Ground
4 Data1 34 Ground
5 Ground 35 Ground
6 Data 2 36 -Busy
7 Ground 37 Ground
8 Data 3 38 -Acknowledge
9 Ground 39 Ground
10 Data 4 40 -Reset
11 Ground 41 Ground
12 Data 5 42 -Message
13 Ground 43 Ground
14 Data 6 44 -Select
15 Ground 45 Ground
16 Data 7 46 -Control/Data
17 Ground 47 Ground
18 Data P 48 -Request
19 Ground 49 Ground
20 Ground 50 -Input/Output
21 Ground 51 Reserved (PS/2 only)
22 Ground 52 Reserved (PS/2 only)
23 Ground 53 Reserved (PS/2 only)
24 Ground 54 Reserved (PS/2 only)
25 Not Connected 55 Reserved (PS/2 only)
26 Terminator Pwr56 Reserved (PS/2 only)
27 Ground 57 Reserved (PS/2 only)
28 Ground 58 Reserved (PS/2 only)
29 Ground 59 Reserved (PS/2 only)
30 Ground 60 Reserved (PS/2 only)

This layout is the same as the IDC-50 SCSI Socket/cable end with
signals 51-60 being added in the PS/2 variety.


PS/2 1.44MB Floppy pinout(could someone verify this)
Pin I/O Signal Pin I/O Signal
--- --- ------ --- --- ------
1 n/a -2nd drive 2 o -high density select
3 n/a reserved 4 n/a reserved
5 n/a ground 6 n/a reserved
7 n/a signal ground 8 i -index
9 n/a signal ground 10 o reserved
11 n/a signal ground 12 o -drive select
13 n/a ground 14 o reserved
15 n/a signal ground 16 o -motor enable
17 n/a signal ground 18 o -direction in
19 n/a signal ground 20 o -step
21 n/a signal ground 22 o -write data
23 n/a signal ground 24 o -write enable
25 n/a signal ground 26 i -track 0
27 n/a signal ground 28 i -write protect
29 n/a signal ground 30 i -read data
31 n/a signal ground 32 o -head 1 select
33 n/a signal ground 34 i -diskette change
35 n/a ground 36 n/a ground
37 n/a ground 38 o +5 VDC
39 n/a ground 40 o +12 VDC

PS/2 34 pin Floppy pinout (not sure please verify)
Pin I/O Signal Pin I/O Signal
--- --- ------ --- --- ------
1 n/a Signal Return 2 o Data rate select 1
3 n/a +5V DC 4 n/a Drive Type ID 1
5 n/a Signal Return 6 n/a +12V DC
7 n/a signal ground 8 i -index
9 n/a Drive Type ID 0 10 o reserved
11 n/a signal ground 12 o -drive select
13 n/a ground 14 o reserved
15 n/a signal ground 16 o -motor enable
17 n/a Media Type ID 1 18 o -direction in
19 n/a signal ground 20 o -step
21 n/a signal ground 22 o -write data
23 n/a signal ground 24 o -write enable
25 n/a signal ground 26 i -track 0
27 n/a Media Type ID 0 28 i -write protect
29 n/a signal ground 30 i -read data
31 n/a signal ground 32 o -head 1 select
33 n/a Data Rate Select 0 34 i -diskette change

PS/2 44-Pin Disk Controller [Thanks to Make Sakaki and chris@ship.net]
The Model 25/30(286?) HardDrive is an old XT IDE type drive. The connector to
the system-board is a ribbon cable that is not compatible to the "standard"
clone connection.

-----------------------------+-----------------------------
Pin I/O Signal | Pin I/O Signal
-----------------------------+-----------------------------
21 I -IOW | 22 N/A Ground
23 I -DISK CS | 24 N/A Ground
25 I A0 | 26 N/A Ground
27 I A1 | 28 N/A Ground
29 I A2 | 30 N/A +5 VDC
31 N/A Reserved | 32 I/O +5 VDC
33 I/O -DACK3 | 34 N/A Ground
35 I/O DRQ3 | 36 N/A Ground
37 O IRQ5 | 38 N/A Ground
39 O IO CH RDY | 40 I +12 VDC
41 N/A Spare | 42 I +12 VDC
43 N/A Spare | 44 I +12 VDC
-----------------------------+-----------------------------

The HD requires +12V and +5V.
Get +12V from wire 40/42/44, and +5V from 30/32.
Get Ground from wire 34/36/38 and 24/26/28.


(Standard Clone) Power Connector:


40 34 24
42 36 26 30 <--- (Pins/Wires Connected)
44 38 28 32
| | | |
| | | |
______________
| | | |
| | | | Top
| | | |
| | | |
--------------
____________
/ | +12v = Red
| O O O O | Front +5V = Yellow
-------------- G = Black (Sometimes Orange)
12v G G 5v



Appendix F PS/2 Sound Cards

From: Jacques@cpmc.ucl.ac.be (Alain Jacques)

******************************************************************************
* Sound Cards for the MCA BUS computer *
*****************************************************************************
2/23/95

Below is a list of nineteen audio cards for the Micro-channel computer.
Twelve of these Audio cards are known to be out of production and are not
currently available. These are labeled "(No longer in production)" after the
product name.

While some cards are no longer on the market as new, you may have some luck
locating a dealer with old stock (slim chance), or find one used in the
classifieds somewhere. Older sound cards may not have 16 bit stereo and other
features found in newer sound cards. Be sure to verify what you are getting
and what your programs require to avoid any suprises and disapointments.

Note that not all sound cards are suitable for game play. Some are designed
for business audio needs only. Look for cards labeled as "Sound Blaster
compatible" if you wish to play games with the card in question. Note that
Sound Blaster compatibility is not always 100% in cards not made by Creative
Labs. What this means is some games may play perfectly, others may not.

*****************************************************************************

Product: Ad Lib Gold 2000MC (No longer in production)

Company: Ad Lib, Inc.
Address: 220 Grande Allee, E, Ste. 850
Quebec City, QB, CD G1R 2J1
800-463-2686; 418-529-9676
FAX: 418-529-1159
Tech support: 418-529-6252

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Special Function Boards

Specs: Pricing: $500
Standard warranty included: 1 yr.
Date announced: 1992
Function: Audio processing
Compatible with: MCA PS/2 Model 50, 60, 70, 80
Interfaces provided: SCSI interface
Size of board: 3/4 length


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Model VP800 (No longer in production)

Company: Antex Electronics Corp.
Address: 16100 S. Figueroa St.
Gardena, CA 90248
800-338-4231; 310-532-3092
FAX: 310-532-8509
Tech support: Use toll-free no.

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Special Function Boards

Specs: Pricing: $325
Date announced: 1991
Function: Audio processing
Compatible with: MCA
Size of board: Full length


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: AT&T Business Audio for MCA
AT&T/GIS Kit# 3099-K070

Company: AT&T
Direct sales: 800-542-9907 (AT&T Direct)

Category: PC Boards
Sound Boards/MIDI

Comes with the following applications:
Sound Finder
Quick Recorder
Voice & Sound Animation
Voice Pilot
ProofReader

Kit includes:
Microphone w/stand
Pair of lightweight headphones
Four pin cable for connecting to CD-ROM audio outputs
Mini plug connectors for:
Microphone
Headphones or external speakers
Stereo Line in
Stereo Line out
Microsoft Sound System version 2.0 (5 diskettes)
AT&T Business Audio Diagnostics (1 diskette)
MS BA User Guide
Hardware users guide

Requires:
Intel 486 or higher
640Mb + 4Mb extended
10Mb of disk space
VGA Display
Works with DOS; Windows 3.1, Windows NT.

Configurable for Sound Blaster compatibility with an enclosed utility.
Rated by the FCC for class B use,


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Sound Blaster MCV (No longer in production)

Company: Creative Labs, Inc. (subsidiary of Creative Technology)
Address: 1901 McCarthy Blvd.
Milpitas, CA 95035
800-998-LABS; 408-428-6600
FAX: 408-428-6611
Tech support: 408-428-6622

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Special Function Boards

Specs: Pricing: $350
Date announced: 1991
Function: Audio processing
Compatible with: MCA PS/2 Model 50, 60, 70, 80
Graphics standard supported: VGA
Interfaces provided: MIDI interface
Size of board: 3/4 length


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Audio Capture/Playback Adapter (No longer in production)

Company: IBM (International Business Machines)
Address: Old Orchard Rd.
Armonk, NY 10504
800-426-2468; 914-765-1900
Tech support: Use toll-free no.

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Special Function Boards

Specs: Pricing: $565
Standard warranty included: 90-day
Date announced: 1989
Function: Audio processing
Compatible with: MCA PS/2 Model 50, 60, 70, 80


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Audiovation Adapter/A

Company: IBM (International Business Machines)
Address: Old Orchard Rd.
Armonk, NY 10504
800-426-3333; 914-765-1900
Direct sales: 800-426-7695 (IBM PC Direct)
Tech support: 800-237-5511
Tech support BBS: 919-517-0001; 800-847-7211 (OS2)

Category: PC Boards
Sound Boards/MIDI

Specs: Mfr. suggested list price: $300
Standard warranty included: 1 yr.
Date announced: 1993
Product classification: Sound board
Compatibility: MCA
Audio recording size: 16 bit
Audio recording rate: 4-44.1 KHz stereo
Audio playback size: 16 bit
Audio playback rate: 4-44.1 KHz stereo
Sound card compatibility: Sound Blaster
Synthesizer type: Wavetable
Interfaces/connectors: CD-ROM; MIDI; Joystick; Line-in; Line-out;
Microphone


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Ultimedia Audio Adapter

Company: IBM (International Business Machines)
Address: Old Orchard Rd.
Armonk, NY 10504
800-426-3333; 914-765-1900
Direct sales: 800-426-7695 (IBM PC Direct)
Tech support: 800-237-5511
Tech support BBS: 919-517-0001; 800-847-7211 (OS2)

Category: PC Boards
Sound Boards/MIDI

Specs: Mfr. suggested list price: $295
Date announced: 1994 *
Product classification: Sound board
Compatibility: MCA
Audio recording size: 16 bit
Audio recording rate: 44 KHz stereo
Audio playback size: 16 bit
Audio playback rate: 44 KHz stereo
Interfaces/connectors: Microphone


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Ultimedia M-Audio Capture/Playback Adapter/A

Company: IBM (International Business Machines)
Address: Old Orchard Rd.
Armonk, NY 10504
800-426-3333; 914-765-1900
Direct sales: 800-426-7695 (IBM PC Direct)
Tech support: 800-237-5511
Tech support BBS: 919-517-0001; 800-847-7211 (OS2)

Category: PC Boards
Sound Boards/MIDI

Specs: Mfr. suggested list price: $235
Date announced: 1991 *
Product classification: Sound board
Compatibility: MCA
Audio recording size: 16 bit
Audio recording rate: 8-44.1 KHz stereo
Audio playback size: 16 bit
Audio playback rate: 8-44.1 KHz stereo
General MIDI standard supported: Yes
Interfaces/connectors: Line-in; Line-out; Microphone


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: ActionMedia 750 Capture Board/MCA (No longer in production)

Company: Intel Corp.
Address: 2200 Mission College Blvd.
Santa Clara, CA 95054
800-538-3373; 408-765-8080
FAX: 408-765-1821

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Video/Graphics Boards

Specs: Pricing: $2,150
Date announced: 1990
Function: Motion video
Compatible with: MCA PS/2 Model 50, 60, 70, 80
Additional functions: Converts analog audio and video signals into
digital data; captures two-channel audio, hi-res still images
and motion video from live or recorded sources


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: ActionMedia 750 Delivery Board/MCA (No longer in production)

Company: Intel Corp.
Address: 2200 Mission College Blvd.
Santa Clara, CA 95054
800-538-3373; 408-765-8080
FAX: 408-765-1821

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Video/Graphics Boards

Specs: Pricing: $1,995-$2,495
Date announced: 1990
Function: Motion video
Compatible with: MCA PS/2 Model 50, 60, 70, 80
Bits per pixel: 24
Number of colors available: 16.8M
Graphics resolution: 1024x480; 768/512x480
RAM: 1M-2M bytes
Size of board: Full length
Additional functions: Enables playback of motion video, still
images, graphics and audio from digital storage media


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: ActionMedia II Capture Board/MCA (No longer in production)

Company: IBM (International Business Machines)
Address: Old Orchard Rd.
Armonk, NY 10504
800-426-3333; 914-765-1900
Direct sales: 800-426-7695 (IBM PC Direct)
Tech support: 800-237-5511
Tech support BBS: 919-517-0001; 800-847-7211 (OS2)

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Video/Graphics Boards

Specs: Pricing: $495
Standard warranty included: 1 yr.
Date announced: 1991
Function: Motion video
Compatible with: MCA
Additional functions: Digitizes analog audio and video analog
signals; captures audio, still images and motion video from live
or recorded sources


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: ActionMedia II Delivery Board/MCA

Company: IBM (International Business Machines)
Address: Old Orchard Rd.
Armonk, NY 10504
800-426-3333; 914-765-1900
Direct sales: 800-426-7695 (IBM PC Direct)
Tech support: 800-237-5511
Tech support BBS: 919-517-0001; 800-847-7211 (OS2)

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Video/Graphics Boards

Specs: Pricing: $995
Standard warranty included: 1 yr.
Date announced: 1991
Function: Motion video
Compatible with: MCA
Number of colors available: 16.8M
Size of board: Full length
Additional functions: Provides still and motion video with audio
compression, decompression, video manipulation and graphics
functions; S-VHS video output for PAL or NTSC


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Gloria

Company: Jovian Logic Corp.
Address: 47929 Fremont Blvd.
Fremont, CA 94538
510-651-4823
FAX: 510-651-1343
Tech support BBS: 510-651-6989

Category: PC Boards
Sound Boards/MIDI

Specs: Mfr. suggested list price: $495
Standard warranty included: 2 yr.
Date announced: 1994
Product classification: Sound board
Compatibility: ISA (16 bit); MCA
Audio recording size: 16 bit
Audio recording rate: 16-44.1 KHz stereo
Audio playback size: 16 bit
Audio playback rate: 16-44.1 KHz stereo
Interfaces/connectors: Line-in; Line-out; Microphone


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Super VideoWindows-MCA (No longer in production)

Company: New Media Graphics Corp.
Address: 780 Boston Rd.
Billerica, MA 01821
800-288-2207; 508-663-0666
FAX: 508-663-6678
Tech support: 508-663-0666, ext. 126

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Video/Graphics Boards

Specs: Pricing: $995
Standard warranty included: 1 yr.
Date announced: 1991
Function: Motion video
Compatible with: MCA
Bits per pixel: 24
Number of colors available: 16.7M
Graphics resolution: 800x600
RAM: 750K bytes
Size of board: 3/4 length
Additional functions: Plays full-motion video and stereo audio in
any size window; individual frame storage; graphics/text
overlay; NTSC or PAL input


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: DSA-340 (No longer in production)

Company: Online Computer Systems,Inc. (subsidiary of Reed International,PLC)
Address: 20251 Century Blvd.
Germantown, MD 20874
800-922-9204; 301-428-3700
FAX: 301-428-2903
Tech support: 800-643-4351

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, sound, controllers, ...)
Sound Boards/MIDI

Specs: Pricing: $595
Date announced: 1988
Product classification: Sound board
Compatibility: MCA
Audio recording size: 8 bit
Audio recording rate: 4-12 KHz stereo
Audio playback size: 8 bit
Audio playback rate: 4-12 KHz stereo
Interfaces/connectors: Line-in; Line-out


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: DSA-1640 (No longer in production)

Company: Online Computer Systems, Inc.
Address: 20251 Century Blvd.
Germantown, MD 20874
800-922-9204; 301-428-3700
FAX: 301-428-2903
Tech support: 800-643-4351

Category: PC Boards (video, fax, motherboards, controllers, ...)
Special Function Boards

Specs: Pricing: $1,095
Date announced: 1991
Function: Audio processing
Compatible with: MCA
Size of board: Full length


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Sound Piper

Company: Piper Research, Inc.
Attn: Sales
PO Box 241
Newport, MN 55055
1-612-459-2770
FAX: 1-612-881-5840
Tech support BBS: 1-612-730-5860
FAX: 1-408-428-6633
E-Mail: 74544.3103@compuserve.com
www.piper-research.com

** Currently NOT sold through re-sellers, order direct from Piper Research.

Category: PC Boards
Sound Boards/MIDI

Specs: Mfr. suggested list price: $129.95-179.95
Limited warranty included: 1 yr. BBS
Date announced:
Product classification: Sound board; Multimedia PC compatible
Compatibility: MCA Half size adapter
Environments: DOS, Windows 3.1, OS/2
Audio recording size: 16 bit
Audio recording rate: 4-44.1 KHz stereo
Audio playback size: 16 bit
Audio playback rate: 4-44.1 KHz stereo
Sound card compatibility: Sound Blaster
Synthesizer type: Yamaha OPL3 20 voice stereo FM Music Synthesizer
Interfaces/connectors: MIDI; Joystick; Line-in; Line-out;
Microphone; 4 watt stereo amplifier output

Features:
- Patented ESPCM compression
- Programmable digital volume control
- Stereo mixer and amplifier
- Compatible with all major software programs

Bundled software:
- Audio recorder
- Audio reminder
- Audio chime library
- Chime
- Mixer
- Stopwatch
- Talking calculator
- Talking clock - Timer

Summary:
The SoundPiper 16 is a state-of-the-art, high integration 16 bit stereo
sound card for PS/2 Micro Channel Architecture personal computers.
The SoundPiper 16 has a built in 5 channel mixer for both record and
layback. It has stereo inputs for CD-audio, line-in, music synthesis,
and digital audio, and a mono input for a microphone. It is now even
better with the 32 bit and 32 bit 3D sound versions.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: MPU-IMC

Company: Roland Corp. U.S.
Address: 7200 Dominion Circle
Los Angeles, CA 90040-3696
213-685-5141
FAX: 213-722-0911
Tech support: Use main no.

Category: PC Boards
Sound Boards/MIDI

Specs: Mfr. suggested list price: $179
Standard warranty included: 1 yr.
Date announced: 1992
Product classification: MIDI interface
Compatibility: MCA PS/2
MPU-401 compatible: Yes
Interfaces/connectors: MIDI-in; MIDI-out; Tape-in; Tape-out;
Metronome out


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Product: Mwave/MCA

Company: Texas Instruments, Inc.
Address: 135000 N. Central Expwy.
Dallas, TX 75265
800-848-3927; 214-995-2011
FAX: 214-995-4360
Tech support: 817-774-6660
Tech support BBS:817-774-6809 (Printers)

Category: PC Boards
Sound Boards/MIDI

Specs: Mfr. suggested list price: $150-$200
Date announced: 1992
Product classification: Sound board
Compatibility: MCA PS/2 Model 50, 60, 70, 80
Audio recording size: 16 bit
Audio recording rate: 8-44.1 KHz stereo
Audio playback size: 16 bit
Audio playback rate: 8-44.1 KHz stereo
Sound card compatibility: Sound Blaster
Synthesizer type: Wavetable
Interfaces/connectors: Joystick; Line-in; Line-out


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mirrored from Compu$erve

END OF PS/2 FAQ

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